The Signs, Symptoms And Stages Of Lyme Disease

signs symptoms and stages of Lyme disease
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Lyme disease continues to be a hot topic in the news, likely because it is increasing at an alarming rate due to climate changes and other factors.

Between 2004 and 2009 reported cases of Lyme disease rose 94%.

And the number of cases continue to rise today.

Fortunately, people are starting to take notice of this disturbing trend.

But, if Lyme disease continues to spread, often unrecognized and untreated, it won’t take long before everyone either knows someone who has it, or they have it themself.

Lyme is now much more common than AIDS, West Nile Virus, and other vector-borne illnesses.

Knowing what to look out for is crucial.

I’ve been living with late-stage chronic Lyme for the past 5 years. I don’t want anyone to have to go through this horrible illness and believe prevention is essential.

I’m going to share the signs, symptoms, and stages of Lyme disease below so you know what to watch for. I truly hope this will help you protect yourself and your loved ones.

signs, symptoms and stages of Lyme diseaseSigns Symptoms And Stages Of Lyme Disease

1. Early Localized Lyme Disease (1 to 4 weeks)

This stage can develop from days to weeks after becoming infected.

Symptoms may include:

  • Rashes – Less that 50% of Lyme patients remember developing a rash. Sometimes the rash looks like a bulls-eye. This is referred to as erythema migrans (EM). It is a myth that you must  have this rash to have Lyme disease (1). I did not ever see a bull-eye rash, but have developed a number of unusual red and splotchy rashes since the tick bites (for more on rashes, keep reading below).
  • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever and chills, fatigue, headache, pain or stiffness in the neck and swollen lymph nodes (2).
  • Nausea, dizziness and vomiting

Stage 2: Early Disseminated Lyme Disease Infection (1 to 4 months)

This stage develops when the disease is not found and/or treated properly soon after infection. At this point the infection can begin to affect the joints, heart, nervous system and skin.

Symptoms may include:

  • More rashes that start to appear in different parts of the body due to the infection spreading
  • Paralysis of the facial muscles, or Bell’s Palsy
  • Fainting
  • Headaches or migraines
  • Painful, swollen joints, such as the knees
  • Heart palpitations or Lyme carditis
  • Conjunctivitis, or pink eye
  • Meningitis – swelling of the brain

Stage 3: Late Persistent Lyme Disease, Or Chronic Lyme

Failure to treat Lyme promptly can cause damage to the brain, joints and nervous system. This is the most serious stage.

Symptoms may include:

  • Extreme exhaustion which is not relieved by sleeping or resting
  • Inability to control facial muscles
  • Heart problems, such as pericarditis
  • Tingling and numbness of the hands and feet
  • Arthritis, often in the larger joints, such as the knees
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Confusionsigns symptoms and stages of Lyme disease
  • Difficulty thinking or reasoning
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Getting lost, even in familiar areas
  • Anxiety, panic attacks
  • Seizures
  • Tremor
  • Sensitivity to sound, light and smells
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Mood swings, depression
  • Sleep disorders
  • Migrating joint and muscle pain
  • Vertigo
  • Difficulty hearing
  • Vision difficulties
  • Weight gain or loss
  • “Air hunger”
  • Pain in the chest or ribs
  • “Heart block”
  • Neck pain, stiffness and cracking
  • Night sweats
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Heart murmur or valve prolapse
  • Light-headedness, dizziness
  • Menstrual irregularity

The Takeaway

This list of signs, symptoms and stages of Lyme disease is not exhaustive. I’ve talked to a lot of people with Lyme and many of our symptoms are similar, but others are different.

My friend, if you are struggling with an illness and the doctors have been unable to help you, you may want to consider this list to help you rule out (or in) Lyme disease, especially if you spend a lot of time outdoors or live in a tick-infested area.

And of course, if you know you’ve been bit by a tick, mosquito, etc and aren’t feeling well, please get yourself checked out immediately.

Here is a list of doctors who specialize in treating Lyme patients. I would highly recommend starting here.


Do you have any of these symptoms? Or do you have an unexplained illness and can’t seem to get answers?

Please share your comments below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!


For more on Lyme disease, you may want to check out:

Connect With Me Below:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
Instagram — @LoriGeurin
Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.

Finally, the information provided in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to treat, prevent, diagnose or cure any disease or health problem.


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13 Curcumin And Turmeric Benefits: An Impressive Healing Spice

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Turmeric is a spice belonging to the ginger family. It is commonly used in Asian food, such as curry. The vibrant yellow-orange color and zesty flavor make a delicious and healthful addition to a variety of dishes.

Curcumin is a yellow chemical produced by the turmeric plant. It is loaded with antioxidants!

Many studies show that turmeric is more effective than many prescription drugs. And, because turmeric is all-natural, it comes without the bothersome side effects of prescriptions.

Turmeric benefits make it one of the most impressive nutritional dietary supplements available. So read on to learn what makes this spice so unique.

13 Curcumin And Turmeric Benefits

1. A Powerful Anti-Inflammatory

When our body experiences long-term inflammation it can lead to a host of diseases. In fact, it’s now believed that most Western chronic diseases involve ongoing inflammation. This includes cancer, metabolic disorders, Alzheimer’s, heart disease and many other diseases.

Amazingly, the curcumin in turmeric is a powerful anti-inflammatory, as strong as effective as some pharmaceuticals without the side effects (1).

2. Can Help Prevent And Treat Cancer

Cancer is a horrible disease caused by out-of-control growth of abnormal cells.

Encouraging research studies show that curcumin may help prevent and treat different types of cancer. (2)

3. A Natural Painkiller

Results of a study in the European Journal of Pharmacology show that curcumin turns on the opioid systems in lab animals. This our body’s natural pain-killing response.

The U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research recommends that burn victims be treated with all-natural curcumin instead of addictive opioids. This trend away from prescription opioids is a very good one if you ask me.

4. May Reverse Depression Symptoms

In one study, curcumin was shown to be as effective as prozac in treating patients with depression. (4) And, once again, without the side effects.

Evidence also suggests curcumin increases the brain’s serotonin and dopamine levels. (5, 6).

5. A Natural Treatment For Arthritis

Arthritis is a common condition that causes pain, inflammation and stiffness in the joints.

In a study published in Phytotherapy Research in 2012, patients with rheumatoid arthritis were given curcumin. It was found to be more effective than an anti-inflammatory drug for treating their arthritis symptoms. (7)

6. May Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that destroys the memory. One feature of Alzheimer’s is the buildup of Amyloid plaques. Research shows curcumin can help wipe out these plaques. (8)

7. Lowers Heart Disease Risk

turmeric benefits
Curcumin my lower the risk of heart disease.

Heart disease kills more people worldwide than any other disease.

There are many things that contribute to it, but curcumin may help reverse some of these processes. (9)

The endothelium is the lining of the blood vessels. It is essential in maintaining proper blood pressure and blood clotting. Studies show that curcumin can improve endothelial function, which is essential in preventing heart disease. (10)

8. A Powerful Antioxidant

Antioxidants protect our bodies from damage caused by free radicals. Curcumin is a potent antioxidant that can counteract free radicals. (11)

Curcumin can also activate the body’s antioxidant-producing enzymes. (12)

9. Lower Blood Sugar And Reverse Diabetes

Biochemistry and Biophysical Research Communications published a study in 2009 out of Auburn University that found turmeric can help reverse Type 2 Diabetes.

Furthermore, the study noted that curcumin is 200 times more potent than Metformin (a leading diabetes medication) when it comes to initiating AMPK, which improves insulin sensitivity. (13)

10. Can Help Heal The Gut

Over time, taking prescription drugs can damage the stomach floral and intestinal lining causing a host of gastrointestinal issues.

A review of all the studies assessing curcumin’s ability to manage inflammatory bowel disease found many patients improved so dramatically by taking curcumin that they were able to stop taking prescription steroids they’d been taking prior. (14)

11. Regulates Cholesterol

A 2008 study published in the journal Drugs in R & D found that curcumin was as effective or more effective at treating symptoms of high cholesterol than Lipitor. (15)

12. Reduces Risk Of Childhood Leukemia

Children under 5 are more susceptible to leukemia. However, in Asian countries there is a lower incidence of leukemia, likely related to diet. For example, curry is a popular dish there and curry contains turmeric.

Research shows that consuming turmeric may reduce childhood leukemia (12).

13. May Increase Longevity

Because turmeric is rich in antioxidants and helps prevent and reverse many serious diseases, it may add years to your life (or life to your years).

Either way you look at it, turmeric and curcumin are great choices if you’re searching for an anti-aging supplement. So read on for info about how to get the most benefits from this amazing spice.

How To Use Turmeric

turmeric benefits
Curcumin is used to flavor many dishes, including this vegetable curry.
  1. Add it to your food. Popular in curry dishes, it’s also a great way to spice up soups, eggs, meat and veggie dishes.
  2. Take it as a supplement. I recommend taking one with black pepper, which contains piperine. The piperine greatly enhances the absorption of the turmeric, like as much as 2000%. Here’s an example of a turmeric curcumin supplement with piperine.
  3. Drink turmeric tea. Here’s a simple recipe, courtesy of realsimple.com:

 Replace the water with coconut or almond milk if you prefer, and modify according to taste, adding spices such as cinnamon, ginger or cayenne and natural sweeteners.

  • 1-2 cups of boiling water
  • Add 1-2 teaspoon of ground or freshly-grated turmeric (preferably USDA certified organic to avoid contaminants and pesticides) to the boiling water. If too strong, use less turmeric. Simmer for about 10 minutes along with any additional spices. If using freshly-grated turmeric, simmer for a few minutes longer.
  • Strain the tea into a cup and add lemon, milk or honey to taste.

The Takeaway

In closing, turmeric benefits are impressive, including reversing diabetes and depression, preventing Alzheimer’s, cancer, childhood Leukemia, and managing cholesterol and pain just to name a few. It’s also easy to take as a supplement or use to flavor your food or beverages.

I hope you enjoyed reading about curcumin and turmeric benefits because it really is an amazing spice!


Have you tried turmeric and curcumin? What do you think?

Please share your comments below in the comment section!


Also, if you liked this you may want to check out:

Connect With Me Below:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
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Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

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9 Essential Questions About Intermittent Fasting Answered

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Since I started 16/8 Intermittent Fasting last year I’ve enjoyed some pretty awesome benefits including:

  • better balanced blood sugars
  • fewer sugar cravings
  • weight loss
  • increased concentration during fasting periods
  • less time spent prepping food
  • less body pain

In the mean time I’ve received a bunch of questions about how this whole thing works. I’ve answered some of the most common ones here. I hope this helps you guys!

Intermittent Fasting Q & A

  1. What is Intermittent Fasting (IF)? It’s an eating pattern. It is not a diet. It’s eating, or not eating, in a strategic way.
  2. If I’m fasting in the morning can I still have my coffee or tea? The short answer is yes! Generally speaking, you’re free to have water, black coffee, tea, and greens powder and you should be fine. Also, if you drink one cup of coffee each morning and like to add a splash of cream you’ll most likely be okay. But, if you’re one of those people who drinks it all morning long and adds the fixins each time…then probably not. Most people can get away with consuming 50 to 100 calories during the fast, but any more than this is too much and is considered breaking the fast.
  3. How hard is it…..really?? I love this question! Ha Ha! I certainly hope that didn’t sound insensitive because I had the same question when I started. This one just tickles my funny bone. So, depending on how often you’re fasting it may take a few days to get used to. But it’s been my experience that once I adjusted I wish I’d known about IF sooner. The benefits definitely outweigh any negatives felt in the first couple of days.
  4. How much weight will I lose? This depends on several factors such as how long and often you fast, what you eat between fasts, whether you work out, age, muscle mass, metabolism and other elements.
  5. Can I work out while I’m fasting or will I pass out? Yes, you can work out while fasting. In fact many athletes (and non-athletes) plan their workouts an hour or so before they break their fast so they can eat as soon as they’re finished training. For example they might plan to work out from 12 pm to 1 pm, then eat breakfast/lunch at 1 pm.

    questions about intermittent fasting
    Intermittent fasting is a simple way to lose weight and be healthier.
  6. Do I have to do it every day? No, you can IM as much or as little as you choose. It’s totally up to you.
  7. What’s the difference between a diet and Intermittent Fasting? Dr. Michael Eades does a great job explaining the answer to this question here:
    Diets are easy in the contemplation, difficult in the execution. Intermittent fasting is just the opposite — it’s difficult in the contemplation but easy in the execution.Most of us have contemplated going on a diet. When we find a diet that appeals to us, it seems as if it will be a breeze to do. But when we get into the nitty-gritty of it, it becomes tough. For example, I stay on a low–carb diet almost all the time. But if I think about going on a low–fat diet, it looks easy. I think about bagels, whole wheat bread and jelly, mashed potatoes, corn, bananas by the dozen, etc. — all of which sound appealing. But were I to embark on such a low–fat diet I would soon tire of it and wish I could have meat and eggs. So a diet is easy in contemplation, but not so easy in the long–term execution.Intermittent fasting is hard in the contemplation, of that there is no doubt. “You go without food for 24 hours?” people would ask, incredulously when we explained what we were doing. “I could never do that.” But once started, it’s a snap. No worries about what and where to eat for one or two out of the three meals per day. It’s a great liberation. Your food expenditures plummet. And you’re not particularly hungry. … Although it’s tough to overcome the idea of going without food, once you begin the regimen, nothing could be easier.Dr. Michael Eades
  8. Won’t I have trouble concentrating and feel super tired while I’m fasting? You’d think so, but most people report having more energy and better concentration! Count me in!
  9. Can anyone try Intermittent Fasting? IM is not recommended for people who have eating disorders. Also if you’re pregnant or nursing, if you have diabetes, other blood sugar problems, heart disease or other chronic disease it is best to speak with you doctor before doing an intermittent fast. *Please note that I have been diagnosed with several chronic diseases as well as reactive hypoglycemia that was causing me a lot of problems. Intermittent fasting has helped even out my blood sugar and benefited me in several other ways.

The Takeaway

Intermittent fasting has recently gained notoriety even though it’s been around for ages. More and more studies are showing the benefits of IM on the body. As a flexible eating plan it’s a great way to lose weight and increase concentration and energy.


Have you tried Intermittent Fasting? What did you think? 


Please leave your comments and questions in the comment section below. I love hearing from you and will respond to your messages as soon as possible. Thanks!

If you’d like to learn more about IM you might want to check out:

Connect With Me Below:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
Instagram — @LoriGeurin
Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

This post contains affiliate links. And you can read our Affiliate Policy here.


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16 Vital Facts About Lyme Disease: A National Epidemic

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People are talking more about Lyme disease lately. And with good reason.

A bacteria called Borrelia Burgdorferi causes Lyme. The bacterium is a spiral-shaped spirochete. Try saying that 5 times fast.

But joking aside, Lyme disease is no joking matter. In fact, it’s a serious topic for any of the millions who have it or have had it.

It is a world-wide disease and it has been reported in all 50 states.

So, here are 10 essential facts about Lyme disease–what you need to know:

Facts About Lyme Disease

  1. Lyme disease is a national epidemic. Over 300,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported each year according to the CDC. This is 10 times more than previously reported. Furthermore, Lyme is under-diagnosed and under-reported.
  2. It is called “The Great Imitator”. This is because it can mimic other conditions such as arthritis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, fibromyalgia, Bells Palsy, ALS, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, MS, ADD, Lupus and others.
  3. Less than 50% of Lyme disease patients recall a tick bite. The ticks are often the size of a poppy seed and go undetected. (1)
  4. Less than 50% of Lyme disease patients recall a rash. Despite what you may have heard, many people never get a bulls-eye rash. Some may experience other types of rashes, but many don’t recall a rash at all. (2)
  5. Lyme disease affects 6 times more people in the U.S. than HIV/AIDS, yet it receives less than 1% of the funding. And Lyme is nearly twice as common as breast cancer. Yet insurance doesn’t cover long-term treatment for chronically ill Lyme patients. So they have to pay out-of-pocket for expensive treatments. As a result, many cannot work anymore and have lost their homes simply trying to pay for proper medical care. Something is very wrong with this picture.

    facts about Lyme disease
    Ticks can be as small as a poppy seed.
  6. According to the CDC, Lyme disease is the fastest growing vector-borne disease in the U.S. Vectors include ticks, mosquitoes, flies, parasites, sandflies, fleas and freshwater snails.
  7. Anyone can get Lyme disease. But children and those with lower immune function are the among the most susceptible. People exposed to mold, parasites and systemic infection are also vulnerable.
  8. There are 5 subspecies of Borrelia Burgdorferi (the Lyme spirochete), over 100 strains in the U.S., and 300 strains worldwide. (3) And the really crazy thing is that these spirochetes are adapting to the environment. They can actually change forms to evade antibiotics. The different forms include cyst form, cell-wall-deficient form and spirochete form.
  9. The number of cases of Lyme reported annually has increased nearly 25-fold since national surveillance started in 1982. (4) And that doesn’t even include all the unreported cases.
  10. Lyme disease is transmitted by a tick bite. Ticks are everywhere. They know no borders. So if you are sick and have Lyme disease symptoms please go to a Lyme-literate doctor. Here is a link to help you find a doctor who specializes in treating patients with Lyme disease. Also, spirochetes were found in mosquitoes and horse flies, according to Willie Burgdorfer, the man who discovered Lyme disease. However, they don’t yet know the rate of transmission. (5)
  11.  The most commonly given test for Lyme is the ELISA test. But, it is unreliable and misses 35% of culture-proven Lyme disease. (6) Currently, the most sensitive test is the IgG and ImG Western Blot tests, available through IGeneX Lab in Palo Alto. www.igenex.com.
  12. People who often spend time outdoors are more likely to get Lyme. If you spend time working outside in the grass or woods apply a tick-repellent before going out. And make sure to be extra vigilant to check for ticks when you come inside. Also it’s best to remove your clothes as soon as you come in and wash and dry them. Finally, check thoroughly for ticks before taking a shower. This may sound like a lot of work, but it’s so much better than the alternative.
  13. Test for other tick-borne illnesses too. Examples of these co-infections include: Babesia, Tularemia, Anaplasma, Bartonella, Rocky Mountain Spotted Tick Fever and Ehrlichia. If any of these or others are present and left untreated it reduces the chances of successful Lyme disease treatment. (7)
  14. No studies show 30 days of antibiotic treatment cure chronic Lyme disease. According to ilads.org, “Short treatment courses have resulted in upwards of a 40% relapse rate, especially if treatment is delayed.” (8)
  15. When first getting bit, common symptoms include: flu-like symptoms, headaches, dizziness, fainting, fatigue, muscle pain, vision problems, nausea, loss of appetite, swollen glands, rashes, neck stiffness and pain, trouble sleeping, chills, sweats. In addition, you may want to read The Signs, Symptoms And Stages Of Lyme Disease for more details.   
  16. Lyme can cause long-term complications when it’s untreated. And, unfortunately, the average Lyme disease patient sees 5 different doctors over the course of about 2 years before being diagnosed. This was my experience too. By this time, the disease has done tremendous damage to the body and patients often end up having long-term health problems. (9)  At this point it is called Chronic Lyme Disease, or sometimes called Late Persistent Lyme Disease. Symptoms include:
  • Extreme exhaustion not relieved by sleeping or resting
  • Inability to control facial muscles
  • Heart problems, such as pericarditis
  • Tingling and numbness of the hands and feet
  • Arthritis, often in the larger joints, such as the knees
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Confusion
    facts about Lyme disease
    Failure to treat Lyme promptly can cause damage to the brain, joints and nervous system. This is the most serious stage, Chronic Lyme Disease, or Late Persistent Lyme Disease
  • Difficulty thinking or reasoning
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Getting lost in familiar places
  • Anxiety, panic attacks
  • Seizures
  • Tremor
  • Sensitivity to sound, light and smells
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Mood swings, depression
  • Sleep disorders
  • Migrating joint and muscle pain
  • Vertigo
  • Difficulty hearing
  • Vision difficulties
  • Weight gain or loss
  • “Air hunger”
  • Pain in the chest or ribs
  • “Heart block”
  • Neck pain, stiffness and cracking
  • Night sweats
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Heart murmur or valve prolapse
  • Light-headedness, dizziness
  • Menstrual irregularity

The Takeaway

In summary, Lyme disease is a serious, debilitating disease. And it’s essential to know the facts. Most of all, I hope this has helped you learn more about Lyme disease so you can protect yourself and your family.


Do you know anyone with Lyme disease?

Please share your thoughts and experiences below. I love hearing from you!


Also, for more about Lyme disease you may want to check out:

Finally, the information provided in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to treat, prevent, diagnose or cure any disease or health problem.

Connect With Me Below:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
Instagram — @LoriGeurin
Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

Also, this post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.


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