How Intermittent Fasting Cured My Hypoglycemia

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A couple of years ago I started having frequent blood sugar issues. I would eat a meal or snack, then less than two hours later, break out in a cold sweat, feeling weak, dizzy, nauseated and like I was going to pass out. Maybe you can relate? There were many times I was on the verge of fainting with my head between my knees, or lying down on the couch while my husband fed me a banana with peanut butter trying to get my sugars back up.

These “episodes” started coming more often and more intensely. And, with all the other health problems I was encountering with the Lyme disease, I knew I should get it checked out.

Reactive Hypoglycemia And A Wake-Up Call

My doctor ordered me a fasting 3-hour glucose tolerance test. If you’ve ever been through this you know the experience takes half a day. You have to drink a cold, syrupy (and nauseating) liquid, then wait at the doctor’s office, having your blood drawn multiple times, at 1-hour intervals to check your glucose levels. I remember feeling okay after the first blood draw, and feeling sleepy and sick after the second.

Then, after the third blood draw I was so ready to get out of there and go home because I felt extremely weak and nauseated. The office was only a 10-minute drive from my house so I didn’t think much of it. But as they say, “hindsight is 20/20.”

intermittent fasting cured my hypoglycemia

I got in my car and drove about a half mile from the doctor’s office when I went around a sharp curve, feeling myself fade in and out of consciousness, nearly passing out, driving off the road and almost into a ditch.

It was scary. If I’d known how out of it I truly was I never would have attempted to drive myself home. I was thankful I was safe and that I didn’t cause an accident. Although it certainly wasn’t the best decision I’ve ever made, it was definitely a wake-up call.

As expected, my doctor called a few days later and said my test results showed that I had reactive hypoglycemia. She asked me how I’d felt after the last blood draw and I confessed my near-accident. Then she mentioned she didn’t know how I drove home because my glucose levels were so low. She referred me to a special diet for people with hypoglycemia and I started following it right away.

How Intermittent Fasting Cured My Hypoglycemia

I immediately started researching natural cures for hypoglycemia on my own and found information about intermittent fasting and how it reduces insulin resistance and can prevent Type 2 diabetes. After talking to my doctor I started the 16:8 IF and within a couple of weeks noticed drastic improvements.

The cold sweats, weakness, constant hunger and cravings for sweets and carbs dissipated, and has continued to improve over time. I used to have horrible brain fog due to the neurological impact of Lyme, but IF has helped with that too. Also, I tend to get easily distracted, but during my fasting periods I’m more focused and better able to concentrate than before. I wish I’d known about IF years ago because it has helped me health-wise in countless ways and simplified my life.

What Is Intermittent Fasting (IF)?

Fasting isn’t a new concept. It’s been around for years. The cavemen and cavewomen did it back in the paleolithic era. In fact, our bodies were designed to live through periods of feast and famine. It was a necessity.

Intermittent fasting, or IF, is a timing concept. It is not about what you eat. But it is about when you eat or when you don’t eat.

Most of us have probably been told we should never skip breakfast….that it is the most important meal of the day. Likewise, we have no doubt heard that we should eat frequent meals and snacks to avoid hunger and boost weight loss. However, it doesn’t matter how many “experts” repeat this information because the research does not support it. And this is probably also why when I followed their advice I was constantly hungry, had food cravings and developed hypoglycemia.

IF has some impressive benefits that extend beyond reduced cravings and hunger (after your body adjusts) and weight loss.

Proven Health Benefits Of Intermittent Fasting

  • Increased longevity (1)
  • Reduces oxidative stress and inflammation (2)
  • May prevent cancer (3)
  • Lowers risk of type 2 diabetes (4)
  • Regulates hormones (5)
  • Repairs cells (autophagy) (6)
  • Weight loss and loss of belly fat (7)

For the basics on how to get started with IM-ing please check out:


Do you have hypoglycemia? Have you tried intermittent fasting? 

Share your thoughts below – I love hearing from you!


The information provided in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to treat, prevent, diagnose or cure any disease or health problem. Please talk to your doctor about IM to learn if it might be a good option for you.

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Intermittent Fasting Nutrition: What To Eat For Maximum Results

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Intermittent fasting nutrition is essential if you’re aiming to lose weight, gain muscle mass and radiate health and vitality.

Intermittent fasting (IM) is a concept that has been around for ages. It is not about what foods you choose eat. But it is all about the timing of when you eat and don’t eat, cycling between periods of feasting and fasting.

Intermittent Fasting Nutrition

Many people will tell you that you can eat whatever you want and still lose weight while intermittent fasting.

And, while this may be true, if you want to be the healthiest version of yourself, then you may want to upgrade your diet and make healthier choices when it comes to nourishing your body with life-giving food.

Here are a few tips to guide your food choices and maximize your results when intermittent fasting:

fasting nutrition
Be sure to eat high-protein foods, such as chicken, grass-fed beef, beans, eggs, fish, Greek yogurt and whey protein.
  • Include a serving of protein with each meal or snack. Examples include plain Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, whole eggs, chicken breast, grass-fed beef,  fish, whey protein, a can of tuna or beans.
  • Eat plenty of leafy green and cruciferous vegetables, such as spinach, romaine lettuce, broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower.
  • Include healthy fats, such as grass-fed butter, coconut oil, olive oil, avocados, nuts and nut butters.
  • If you’re in the mood for something sweet, fruit is an excellent choice.
  • A bit of dark chocolate (at least 70-80% cocoa) is full of antioxidants and makes a delicious and indulgent treat.
  • Complex carbohydrates, including sweet potatoes, brown rice, oats and quinoa are okay if you are able to reach your weight loss goals. Just keep in mind that if your weight loss is stalling you might try eating smaller portions (or eliminate these foods until you reach your goal weight) and see if that helps.
  • Drink plenty of water throughout the day. Coffee and green tea are healthy beverages you can include in your periods of fasting.
  • Avoid simple sugars and simple carbohydrates found in white bread and baked goods.
  • Avoid packaged and processed foods.

The Takeaway

fasting nutrition
Berries are chock full of antioxidants and are an excellent choice when you’re craving something sweet.

To sum up, intermittent fasting is a timing concept, cycling between periods of feasting and fasting.

It is essential to nourish your body with healthy foods such as protein-rich foods, healthy fats, and antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables. Complex carbohydrates are tolerated fine by some people, but this may be something to pay attention to if you have difficulty meeting your weight loss goals.

Finally, avoid sugary, simple carbohydrates and prepackaged foods. And always drink plenty of water.


Have you tried intermittent fasting? What do you like to eat?

Please share your thoughts and comments below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!


You may want to read more about intermittent fasting here:

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The Intermittent Fasting Workout: Benefits Of Exercising In A Fasted State

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If you’re an intermittent fasting (IF) pro, or fasting for the first time, you may be wondering how this lifestyle will mesh with your workouts.

Or if it’s safe to work out at all while fasting.

The great news is that, yes, you can continue your fitness regimen.

As it turns out, training while intermittent fasting has some pretty impressive health benefits which I know you’re going to love.

The Benefits Of Exercising While Fasting

Did you know that exercise and fasting combine to cause oxidative stress on your muscles? It may sound bad, but in this case it’s actually beneficial.

Fitness expert Ori Hofmekler explains acute states of oxidative stress are:

” … essential for keeping your muscle machinery tuned. Technically, acute oxidative stress makes your muscle increasingly resilient to oxidative stress; it stimulates glutathione and SOD [superoxide dismutase, the first antioxidant mobilized by your cells for defense] production in your mitochondria along with increased muscular capacity to utilize energy, generate force and resist fatigue.

Hence, exercise and fasting help counteract all the main determinants of muscle aging. But there is something else about exercise and fasting. When combined, they trigger a mechanism that recycles and rejuvenates your brain and muscle tissues.”

Exercising in a fasted state can help you:

  • burn fat (1)
  • lose weight
  • improve body composition (2)
  • boost cognitive function (3)
  • increase growth hormone (4)

All great reasons to work out before breakfast!

What Kind Of Workout Should I Do While Fasting?

Technically, you can simply fast and reap the benefits. But many people want to work out and further maximize their results.

Thankfully, this doesn’t have to involve going to the gym everyday for an hour, unless you want it to.

The great thing is, this is highly individualized. You can find what works best for you and what activities you enjoy most and do that. Depending on your commitment level and your current personal fitness, your workouts can be tailored to your goals and abilities.

Because intermittent fasting is a lifestyle, you’ll likely find different workouts and schedules that best suit your goals and needs over time. Here are some examples of workout options you might choose while intermittent fasting:

  • Many beginners starting out with IM enjoy taking a gentle walk 2 or 3 days a week for 20 minutes.

    workout
    Intermittent fasting workouts are individualized and fun!
  • If you’re looking for full-body training, you might want to check out 20 Reasons To Try A Kettlebell Workout or The Health Benefits Of Rebounding On A Mini Trampoline for kettlebell and rebounding workouts, which are both fun and invigorating.
  • Many people who love the IM lifestyle find that short, quick bursts of exercise followed by brief recovery periods, such as high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is very effective.
  • Looking for muscle gains and definition? Strength training may be what you’re looking for.
  • Swimming, hiking, yoga, rollerblading, skiing, jogging, dancing, Pilates, team sports, etc. Any activity that gets you moving it great!

So now that you have some ideas for how to train while fasting, I want to share some important tips to help you get the most out of your workouts, as well as some special considerations to be aware of.

Tips For An Intermittent Fasting Workout

  • An easy way to get the fat-burning effects of working out in the fasted state is by exercising first thing in the morning before you eat your first meal of the day. This works great with the 16/8 (or other) IF plan and allows your body to tap into its fat stores.
  • If you’re planning on doing heavy lifting, or other strenuous activity, make sure to eat a protein-rich meal within 30 minutes after your workout. Whey protein is especially beneficial and makes for a quick meal on the go. This is our favorite whey protein. It has 30 grams of whey protein per serving, is gluten-free and has no artificial flavors, colors or sweeteners.
  • Listen to your body. Be mindful of individual factors such as medical history, whether you’re taking prescriptions, age, and physical fitness level. If you need/want to drink a whey protein shake before your workout, do it. If you feel light-headed, your ears are ringing, or you feel like you’re going to pass out during a workout, don’t “tough it out”. Use common sense and pay attention to warning signs like these. Plus, here’s something to consider: A study published in the Medicine and Science in Sports & Exercise journal revealed that consuming 20 grams of whey protein 30 minutes before a resistance training session boosted metabolism for up to 24 hours after the workout. (5)

The Takeaway

To sum up, working out and intermittent fasting can be done together, with many health benefits. These impressive benefits include fat burning, weight loss, improved cognitive and hormone function and improved body composition.

There are a variety of workouts you can do while enjoying the IF lifestyle. Keep in mind if you’re doing heavy lifting or other strenuous workouts, you should eat a high-protein meal, such as a whey protein shake, after your training session. Everyone is unique and requires a specialized fitness regimen. Always listen to your body and use common sense when working out and fasting.


What tips do you have for working out and intermittent fasting? Please share below!


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The Top 7 Myths About Fasting Revealed

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Intermittent fasting is all over the news. Not only is it super popular, but it’s also a highly effective way to lose weight and boost your health.

Intermittent fasting (IM) is an eating pattern which cycles between periods of eating and not eating, or fasting.

But, despite its vast popularity, there are several myths surrounding IM.

This article focuses on the most common myths related to fasting and the frequency of meals and snacks.

Top Myths About Fasting Debunked

1. Intermittent fasting causes muscle loss.

Some people believe when we fast our bodies burn muscle and use it for fuel. And while this is true with dieting in general, there’s no evidence showing this happens with IF.

In fact, evidence suggests that intermittent fasting is superior for maintaining muscle mass. Pretty cool, huh?

In one study, IM caused similar weight loss compared to daily caloric restriction, but showed much less muscle mass reduction. (1)

2. Skipping breakfast is bad for you and will make you gain weight.

myths about fasting
Skipping breakfast will not make you gain weight.

Have you heard? “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” Sure you have. But did you know that this statement has no scientific backing?

In fact, a 2014 randomized controlled trial compared a group of 283 overweight and obese adults eating breakfast vs. skipping breakfast. At the conclusion of the 16-week study, there was absolutely no difference in weight between the two groups. (2)

3. Eat small meals to keep your blood sugar under control.

Despite what many diet “experts” say, you don’t need to eat small meals throughout the day to support energy and be mentally efficient. And this is because blood sugar is well-regulated in healthy people.

Your blood sugar is controlled by ghrelin and other metabolic hormones. And it typically follows the eating patterns you’re used to.

Believe it or not, people can easily adapt to periods of fasting. You don’t have to eat often to control your blood sugar because it adapts to your “entrained meal patterns” just fine.

4. Fasting increases cortisol levels.

Cortisol is a steroid hormone produced in the adrenal glands.

Cortisol is often given a bad wrap, but truth be told, it fulfills many important roles in the human body. It helps control the blood sugar, thereby regulating metabolism. It also works as an anti-inflammatory, and influences memory formation and blood pressure.

Cortisol is what gets you up and moving in the morning. (What’s that you say? You thought that was coffee’s job?) Trust me, I hear you.

One important study found short-term, or intermittent fasting caused cortisol to drop. (3)

So please don’t worry about fasting increasing your cortisone. It simply is not true.

5. Eat often to speed up your metabolism.

Many people believe eating more often will stoke their metabolism, thereby causing them to lose weight.

Although your body does burn some calories (about 10%) when it is digesting food, it isn’t that much. This process is the thermic effect of food (TEC).

But, studies have shown the body will expend the same amount of calories whether you eat all your calories in 2, 3, 5 or 6 meals a day.  Your total caloric intake and macronutrients are what matter. (4)

6. Fasting puts you in “starvation mode” and your body starts shutting

myths about fasting
Intermittent fasting can actually speed up your metabolism!

down.

So many believe this myth. And while it is true for long-term fasting it’s just not so for IM.

In fact, short-term intermittent fasting has been shown to speed up the metabolism!

Any sort of long-term weight loss is going to cause the body to burn fewer calories. And when you weigh less you have fewer calories to burn. That’s why, if you’ve tried losing weight on a point system, such as Weight Watchers, after you’ve lost some weight, your points decrease.

Studies prove that fasting up to 48 hours can boost metabolism 3.6 to 14%! (5) But, if you fast longer the metabolism can go down. So just keep this in mind.

7. Eat more often to avoid getting hungry.

Some people say eating snacks helps ease their hunger and diffuse cravings. And others find that eating less often keeps them satisfied longer. In this case, it seems they’re both right.

There have been several studies on this and they’ve been mixed.

Some studies suggest eating more frequent meals and snacks causes increased hunger, others find no effect, and others show an increase in hunger. (6, 7)

So, if eating healthy snacks between meals helps curb your hunger pangs then go for it. And, however, if you feel better eating fewer snacks and meals then go with that. In this case it’s simply a personal preference.

The Takeaway

Intermittent fasting is a popular and effective way to lose weight and boost your health. But as you can see there are many myths about fasting. It’s good to know what they are so you can have fun with IM and not have to sweat the small stuff! Many people have found success with IF and I hope you do too!

Please let me know if you have any questions! I’m happy to help you in any way I can. 🙂


Have you tried fasting? Can you think of any more myths about fasting you’d add to this list?

Please leave your comments below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!


Also, if you enjoyed this article, you might want to read:

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