Spring Break Adventures With The Family And Tips For Traveling With Chronic Illness

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Hey guys! I’ve been out of the blogosphere for a few days because we took the family on a little spring break adventure to Florida.

I’ve missed being in touch and posting, so I thought I’d share a bit about our trip to let you know what’s been going on in my world.

I took my laptop on the trip thinking I’d write along the way, but between being so busy and feeling pretty wiped out from the fast pace, it simply didn’t happen.

David and I agreed it was one of our favorite trips with the kids yet. I was so thankful the boys could come because they’re often busy with work or other activities like college kids are.

Every family has their own vibe and when we all get together, there’s usually a lot of laughter, and with the 6 of us, things can get pretty loud.

We all love music, joking around, the occasional debate (some more than others-ha!), and having fun.

Spring Break, 2017

traveling with chronic illness
MO State Basketball – David and the girls

The weekend before our flight left for Florida we’d been in Columbia, MO for the Class 4 State Basketball Tournament where our Bolivar High School boys played in the championship game.

They played hard and did a great job!

We went back home for a night and repacked for Florida.

The next afternoon we flew into Orlando and moved into our hotel near SeaWorld.

Universal Studios, Islands Of Adventure

We woke up early the next morning, ate a big breakfast and headed to Universal Studios, Islands of Adventure.

traveling with chronic illness
The kids at the Harry Potter castle.
traveling with chronic illness
Sweet Emma enjoying a Butterbeer.

Drew and Cooper have read the Harry Potter books and seen the movies, and Maddie and Emma have read and seen some too, so this was definitely something they wanted to check out!

Some of the kids even tried the Butterbeer.

We rode ALL the rides we were interested in riding and then some. Thankfully we all love to ride roller coasters so no one was left out and it was a blast. 🙂

Talk about a G-force extravaganza!

And we did a lot of walking! At the end of the day my fitbit said I’d taken over 15,000 steps!

traveling with chronic illness
Cooper trying Butterbeer.
traveling with chronic illness
David and Drew at Universal

Wowza!

By 5:00 we’d conquered all the rides and had such a fun and full day.

We were hungry! So we headed out to Freddy’s for giant burgers and fries and frozen custard (because vacation ;)).

Then back to the hotel to crash around the pool and go to sleep.

SeaWorld

Rest.

Rinse.

And Repeat.

Woke up early. Ate a big breakfast. Headed to SeaWorld first thing.

traveling with chronic illness
Love them.

SeaWorld has changed so much since when D and I were kids. I thought it was pretty cool then, but they have some of the best coasters now, including Mako, Kraken and Manta.

The weather was gorgeous! The lines to the rides were short. I don’t think we had to wait more than 10 minutes to ride anything so we were loving that!

Plus, the shark aquarium is super cool and the Antarctica penguin exhibit

traveling with chronic illness
Coop and penguins

is so fun! Are penguins not the cutest little birds?!

We talked to some beautiful parrots…”Polly want a cracker?”

And petted the stingrays. The leopard print ones were my favorite!

We saw several shows, all of them entertaining and impressive

  • dolphins
  • killer whales
  • sea lions  (arrr, arrr, arrr!)
traveling with chronic illness
Not sure what this is about, but I like it. 😉

Overall, it was another super-fun day! And my fitbit said I had walked

about 14,000 steps….much more than I’ve done lately. Thankful.

But, whew, was I feeling the burn!

We were all hungry for dinner and went to Moe’s and filled up on giant burritos and burrito bowls made with fresh ingredients, including cilantro lime rice and guacamole (my personal favorite).

Then back to the hotel for some relaxation by the pool until we were ready to turn in for the night.

Tips For Traveling With Chronic Illness

If you or someone you love have a chronic illness, you probably understand how difficult traveling can be.

For me, traveling is one of my favorite things to do. I love the beach and won’t pass up an opportunity to go if humanly possible.

But since getting Lyme disease and a host of related medical issues, traveling is often challenging in ways that I never considered before when I was healthy.

I love to be on the go and be involved and it really bums me out when I can’t keep up with everyone else (but it won’t stop me from trying).

Even so, there have been plenty of trips when I’ve been stuck in the hotel room with a migraine, or in too much pain or too exhausted to move, etc. I can definitely be pretty stubborn when it comes to accepting this and have a lot of work to do in this area. But trust me, I get it. It really stinks to be shut in when everyone else is out exploring and having fun.

But then again, I’m praying and working towards recovery of my health so I’m not willing to give in.

I’ve learned the hard way plenty by overdoing it (as I’m sure many of you have too) and then spending a week or more recovering flat-out exhausted.

We all make our choices I suppose.

But you know what? You only live once, and (assuming your doctor hasn’t put restrictions on your activities) sometimes, to me, it’s so worth it to have to take a few days off to recover when I return from a trip.

Like right now, I’m wiped out, but I’m thankful to be able to write this blog post.

This particular trip I made the mistake of forgetting my turmeric curcumin supplement I take for  body pain.

Nothing is perfect, but if we can learn to go with the flow it helps!

Tips To Help When Traveling With Chronic Illness

  • Pack your medicines, supplements, etc. ahead of time to make sure you have everything you’ll need. Research the area you’re visiting. Not to be a Debbie Downer, but do they have a hospital nearby in the case of an emergency? It’s good to be prepared.
  • Communicate with your family or friends you’re traveling with. Be honest about your medical limitations and how you’re feeling.
  • Give yourself grace! You probably won’t be able to do everything you want to do but that’s okay. This is the hardest concept for me but I keep repeating it to myself and it really helps.
  • Be thankful for the small things. Focus on the positives. They are always there. Sometimes we just have to look a little harder to find them.
  • Keep a gratitude journal. I’ve found the more I’m aware of all I’m grateful for, the less I’m aware of the frustrations that come with my illness.
  • Show kindness to your travel companions. Say thank you. When you’re not feeling well it’s so easy to forget this, for me anyway. Try to remember that your illness is not only difficult for you, but can be hard on your loved ones too….because they love you and care about you and want you to feel better.
  • Drink lots of water! Eat healthy, whole foods.
  • Move your body. Gentle stretching is wonderful. If you’re up for a short walk that’s great too.
  • Get some fresh air. Take in the sunset in a comfy chair. Go barefoot outside.
  • Be flexible when scheduling outings.
  • Have fun!

    traveling with chronic illness
    Push ups by the pool

The Takeaway

Thanks for letting me share about our family trip with you!

We’ve enjoyed plenty of “staycations” and they can be super fun too, but I’m thankful it worked out for us to get away together this time.

I want you to know that if you enjoy traveling like I do, you don’t have to give it up just because you have a chronic illness.

Remember to be prepared, honestly communicate how you’re feeling with your travel buddies, give yourself grace, be flexible with your travel plans, focus on the positives and get some fresh air.

Do you enjoy traveling? Do you or someone you love have a chronic illness? What tips would you add to this list?

Please share your thoughts in the comment section below. I love hearing from you and will reply to your comments as soon as possible!

If you liked this, you might want to check out:


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The Top 7 Myths About Fasting Revealed

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Intermittent fasting is all over the news. Not only is it super popular, but it’s also a highly effective way to lose weight and boost your health.

Intermittent fasting (IM) is an eating pattern which cycles between periods of eating and not eating, or fasting.

But, despite its vast popularity, there are several myths surrounding IM.

This article focuses on the most common myths related to fasting and the frequency of meals and snacks.

Top Myths About Fasting Debunked

1. Intermittent fasting causes muscle loss.

Some people believe when we fast our bodies burn muscle and use it for fuel. And while this is true with dieting in general, there’s no evidence showing this happens with IF.

In fact, evidence suggests that intermittent fasting is superior for maintaining muscle mass. Pretty cool, huh?

In one study, IM caused similar weight loss compared to daily caloric restriction, but showed much less muscle mass reduction. (1)

2. Skipping breakfast is bad for you and will make you gain weight.

myths about fasting
Skipping breakfast will not make you gain weight.

Have you heard? “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” Sure you have. But did you know that this statement has no scientific backing?

In fact, a 2014 randomized controlled trial compared a group of 283 overweight and obese adults eating breakfast vs. skipping breakfast. At the conclusion of the 16-week study, there was absolutely no difference in weight between the two groups. (2)

3. Eat small meals to keep your blood sugar under control.

Despite what many diet “experts” say, you don’t need to eat small meals throughout the day to support energy and be mentally efficient. And this is because blood sugar is well-regulated in healthy people.

Your blood sugar is controlled by ghrelin and other metabolic hormones. And it typically follows the eating patterns you’re used to.

Believe it or not, people can easily adapt to periods of fasting. You don’t have to eat often to control your blood sugar because it adapts to your “entrained meal patterns” just fine.

4. Fasting increases cortisol levels.

Cortisol is a steroid hormone produced in the adrenal glands.

Cortisol is often given a bad wrap, but truth be told, it fulfills many important roles in the human body. It helps control the blood sugar, thereby regulating metabolism. It also works as an anti-inflammatory, and influences memory formation and blood pressure.

Cortisol is what gets you up and moving in the morning. (What’s that you say? You thought that was coffee’s job?) Trust me, I hear you.

One important study found short-term, or intermittent fasting caused cortisol to drop. (3)

So please don’t worry about fasting increasing your cortisone. It simply is not true.

5. Eat often to speed up your metabolism.

Many people believe eating more often will stoke their metabolism, thereby causing them to lose weight.

Although your body does burn some calories (about 10%) when it is digesting food, it isn’t that much. This process is the thermic effect of food (TEC).

But, studies have shown the body will expend the same amount of calories whether you eat all your calories in 2, 3, 5 or 6 meals a day.  Your total caloric intake and macronutrients are what matter. (4)

6. Fasting puts you in “starvation mode” and your body starts shutting

myths about fasting
Intermittent fasting can actually speed up your metabolism!

down.

So many believe this myth. And while it is true for long-term fasting it’s just not so for IM.

In fact, short-term intermittent fasting has been shown to speed up the metabolism!

Any sort of long-term weight loss is going to cause the body to burn fewer calories. And when you weigh less you have fewer calories to burn. That’s why, if you’ve tried losing weight on a point system, such as Weight Watchers, after you’ve lost some weight, your points decrease.

Studies prove that fasting up to 48 hours can boost metabolism 3.6 to 14%! (5) But, if you fast longer the metabolism can go down. So just keep this in mind.

7. Eat more often to avoid getting hungry.

Some people say eating snacks helps ease their hunger and diffuse cravings. And others find that eating less often keeps them satisfied longer. In this case, it seems they’re both right.

There have been several studies on this and they’ve been mixed.

Some studies suggest eating more frequent meals and snacks causes increased hunger, others find no effect, and others show an increase in hunger. (6, 7)

So, if eating healthy snacks between meals helps curb your hunger pangs then go for it. And, however, if you feel better eating fewer snacks and meals then go with that. In this case it’s simply a personal preference.

The Takeaway

Intermittent fasting is a popular and effective way to lose weight and boost your health. But as you can see there are many myths about fasting. It’s good to know what they are so you can have fun with IM and not have to sweat the small stuff! Many people have found success with IF and I hope you do too!

Please let me know if you have any questions! I’m happy to help you in any way I can. 🙂

Have you tried fasting? Can you think of any more myths about fasting you’d add to this list?

Please leave your comments below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!

Also, if you enjoyed this article, you might want to read:

Finally, this post contains affiliate links. This simply helps cover expenses to keep the blog up and running. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.


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5 Favorite Intermittent Fasting Methods Explained

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As I’ve shared in earlier posts, Intermittent Fasting (IM) is so great for your health.

Not only can it help you lose weight and belly fat (1), but it also helps with:

  • cellular repair
  • hormone regulation (2)
  • lowering your risk of Type 2 Diabetes (3)
  • preventing Alzheimer’s (4)
  • preventing cancer (5)
  • reducing cholesterol (6)
  • reducing oxidative stress and inflammation (7)
  • increased longevity (8)

For a fast review of IF you might like to refer to The Quick Guide To Intermittent Fasting.

There are a few different ways to do IF. And I love this, because we’re all unique. We don’t need a “one size fits all approach”.

If you’re like me, you want a plan that fits your personality, style and life. So here they are.

The Most Popular Intermittent Fasting Methods

1. The 5:2 Diet

This one was developed by a British journalist and doctor, Michael Mosley. It involves eating normally 5 days of the week and greatly limiting caloric intake the other 2 days.

During the fasting days it’s recommended that women restrict their calories to 500 per day, and men to 600 per day.

So, for example, you might choose Tuesday and Thursday as your fasting days. You could enjoy 2 small meals of 250 to 300 calories each of those days. Or your eat all of your calories all in one meal. Then the other 5 days you would eat normally.

2. 24-Hour Fast (Eat-Stop-Eat)

Fitness expert Brad Pilon made this method popular. It’s recommended to do it only once or twice a week since you’re completely fasting for 24 hours straight.

It’s fine to have calorie-free beverages, such as black coffee, green and herbal teas and plenty of water.

If you’re not sure you can go a full 24 hours that’s fine. Start with 14 or 18, then work your way up.

Many people begin their fast after dinner one night, then break the fast the following night at the same time.

3. 16/8 Fast (LeanGains)

This is my favorite way to IM because (for me) it’s easy and fits my schedule. And this keeps me motivated. Also, I don’t feel like eating when I wake up, so the 16/8 allows me to simply grab my coffee and go.

With this method you’re fasting each day for 16 hours and eating within an 8-hour window. This is also known as the LeanGains method, which was started by fitness guru, Martin Berkhan.

The easiest way to do 16/8 is not to eat after dinner, then skip breakfast. For example, if you finish dinner at 7 pm, and don’t eat your next meal until 1 pm the following day, you’ve fasted for 16 hours.

Some recommend women only fast 14 to 15 hours at a time, but listen to your body. If you are able to go the full 16 and still be healthy about it, then go for it.

4. 20-Hour Fast (The Warrior Diet)

The Warrior Diet was started by Ori Hofmekler. The plan here is to fast for 20 hours, then eat one large meal in the evening.

Something that makes this plan unique is that during the 20-hour fast, you’re allowed to eat small snacks of Paleo-friendly foods, such as raw fruits and vegetables, juice and protein.

Some fasting purists say that because of this The Warrior Diet isn’t a fast at all.

Either way, many people have had great success with it.

5. Meal Skipping 

intermittent fasting methods
You may want to try some different IF methods to find the one that’s right for you.

This is a less structured way to fast that some people enjoy. If you don’t feel hungry for breakfast one morning, simply skip breakfast (or lunch, or dinner).

And don’t worry about what you may have heard about meal skipping. You will not lose muscle or go into starving mode.

This is all a myth. Our bodies are actually quite adept at going without food for long periods of time, so skipping a meal or two here and there is fine.

So if you’re not hungry, or you’re too busy to stop and eat, just skip a meal and eat later.

Special Considerations

If you have an eating disorder, IM is not recommended.

And please keep in mind that it’s not for everyone. Some people love it, but others don’t, and that’s okay.

The Takeaway

IM has some pretty great health benefits including weight loss, increased longevity, and decreased risk of cancer and Alzheimer’s. It can also simplify your life because you spend less time prepping meals and shopping for groceries.

We’ve covered 5 of the most popular Intermittent Fasting methods here today. There is no right or wrong way to do IM. You might want to try a couple of different methods before you find the one you like the best.

Have you tried any of these IF methods? Do you have a favorite? Please share in the comments below!

Finally, if you’d like to learn more about IF you might like to check out:

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.


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Intermittent Fasting: The Effortless Way To Lose Weight

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Okay, so tell me the truth. Do you think I went too far?

With the title of this article, I mean.

Now before I start getting hate mail (which would never come from you, because you guys are great!) please hear me out.

Yes, I realize using the words “fasting” and “effortless”  in the same sentence may sound like an oxymoron, if not tasteless.

But I do have an explanation for this.

Weight Loss Yo-Yo

First, let me share a little background. I’m no longer the “skinny minny” I was in high school, and I’m thankful for that. Now I’m focused on growing healthier and stronger each day.

As a teenager, and like other young, impressionable girls, I was keenly aware, observing the world around me. Though I heard, “pretty is as pretty does” and “beauty comes from the inside”, I also observed a preoccupation with appearances, diets and physical attractiveness.

This combined with societal pressures that girls act and look a certain way places a world of confusion in young minds. As a result, my relationship with food was not always healthy. (Look for a future post on this as it’s a topic of great importance to me.)

But now, thankfully, I enjoy food as much as the next girl. And I’m no stranger to weight loss programs. As a mama to four beautiful, and now grown, babies my body has morphed from thin and frail from Lyme disease to round and 9 months pregnant, and everywhere in between more times than I can count.

fasting lose weightWith each pregnancy I was extremely nauseated, throwing up, unable to keep food down, the first several months. Needless to say I always lost weight and did not gain in the first half of the pregnancies.

And each time this would alarm my doctor, to which he would prescribe that I eat more and start putting on weight. This sounded like an impossible task until the nausea let up towards the latter half of the pregnancies. Then I would proceed full speed ahead by following my doctor’s orders.

You can probably see where this is going….With Drew, our first child, I ended up gaining 43 pounds in 4 months. For someone who’s only 5’6″ I’m pretty sure that set some sort of record?

After he was born I was so busy nursing and caring for a newborn that I was able to lose all the weight before we found out we were expecting his little brother, Cooper, 15 months later.

And, on it went. The weight went up and down with each little bundle of joy. And as our family grew, at times, so did my waistline. And may I just say, that our children have been the most amazing blessings.

So, thanks for indulging my little trip down memory lane, all to say this….

I understand the frustrations and difficulties of wanting to lose weight and putting it off because… I’m too busy with my job, or my family needs me, or there aren’t enough hours in the day, or I don’t want to spend money on a gym membership, or (fill in the blank with an excuse).

If you’re at all like me, we can come up with a million excuses, can’t we?

I truly understand.

The struggle is real.

If I could go back in time, I would approach my weight loss efforts with intermittent fasting (IF).

Why? Because (for me):

  • losing weight is easier with IF
  • it makes life simpler–less meal prepping
  • doesn’t require you to record what you eat (even though I like to do this anyway)
  • I can eat the healthy foods I want and not have to cut out entire food groups
  • it helps my concentration
  • has helped reduce my body pain (symptom of Chronic Lyme disease)
  • it’s improved my short-term memory (another symptom of Lyme)
  • fewer sugar cravings

Intermittent Fasting, Lose Weight The Easy Way

When you are fasting your body has to use its stored fat for energy. This is a good thing and much more effective than just cutting calories. If you want to lose any excess fat you’re carrying around IF is a great way to do it.

So forget what you’ve heard about eating 6 meals a day and read on.

Sciencey Stuff

When you’re fasting your body releases 2 essential fat burning hormones:

  • human growth hormone (HGH)
  • Norepinephrine (noradrenaline)

HGH can aid in both fat loss and muscle gains (1).

When Norepinephrine is released it breaks down body fat into fatty acids which are burned for energy (2).

Also, during fasting periods, insulin decreases significantly (3). This leads to fat burning.

Fat burning!

And more fat burning!

Simplify Your Life

When you eat less often you have fewer meals to plan for. You have less grocery shopping to do. Not to mention, you spend less money on groceries because you’re eating less food.

Yes, you do need to make healthful choices. But, because you’re making healthy choices when you do eat, there’s no need for calorie counting or point tracking. And attending meetings with weigh-ins and complicated point systems is not necessary.

And that hour-long aerobic workout you’ve done every day for as long as you can remember? Feel free to cut back to 2 or 3 days a week for 30 minutes instead. And you might even replace the aerobics with weight training, such as kettlebells. Stay active, but do something fun.

fasting lose weightI’m not saying counting points or working out every day is bad or that you shouldn’t do it.

I still keep a food diary because it makes me aware of what I’m putting into my body.

Whatever works best for you is what you should do.

I just want to share the success I’ve had with IM and encourage you to try it for yourself and see what you think.

Simply look at this as a chance to try something new.

The Takeaway

Intermittent fasting is a great way to burn excess body fat and lose weight. It’s easy to do compared to many other weight loss plans and has several health benefits.

Have you tried intermittent fasting for weight loss? Please share your thoughts and experiences below in the comment section. I love hearing from you and will reply to your comments as soon as I possibly can.

To learn more about intermittent fasting you may want to read:

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.


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9 Essential Questions About Intermittent Fasting Answered

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Since I started 16/8 Intermittent Fasting last year I’ve enjoyed some pretty awesome benefits including:

  • better balanced blood sugars
  • fewer sugar cravings
  • weight loss
  • increased concentration during fasting periods
  • less time spent prepping food
  • less body pain

In the mean time I’ve received a bunch of questions about how this whole thing works. I’ve answered some of the most common ones here. I hope this helps you guys!

Intermittent Fasting Q & A

  1. What is Intermittent Fasting (IF)? It’s an eating pattern. It is not a diet. It’s eating, or not eating, in a strategic way.
  2. If I’m fasting in the morning can I still have my coffee or tea? The short answer is yes! Generally speaking, you’re free to have water, black coffee, tea, and greens powder and you should be fine. Also, if you drink one cup of coffee each morning and like to add a splash of cream you’ll most likely be okay. But, if you’re one of those people who drinks it all morning long and adds the fixins each time…then probably not. Most people can get away with consuming 50 to 100 calories during the fast, but any more than this is too much and is considered breaking the fast.
  3. How hard is it…..really?? I love this question! Ha Ha! I certainly hope that didn’t sound insensitive because I had the same question when I started. This one just tickles my funny bone. So, depending on how often you’re fasting it may take a few days to get used to. But it’s been my experience that once I adjusted I wish I’d known about IF sooner. The benefits definitely outweigh any negatives felt in the first couple of days.
  4. How much weight will I lose? This depends on several factors such as how long and often you fast, what you eat between fasts, whether you work out, age, muscle mass, metabolism and other elements.
  5. Can I work out while I’m fasting or will I pass out? Yes, you can work out while fasting. In fact many athletes (and non-athletes) plan their workouts an hour or so before they break their fast so they can eat as soon as they’re finished training. For example they might plan to work out from 12 pm to 1 pm, then eat breakfast/lunch at 1 pm.

    questions about intermittent fasting
    Intermittent fasting is a simple way to lose weight and be healthier.
  6. Do I have to do it every day? No, you can IM as much or as little as you choose. It’s totally up to you.
  7. What’s the difference between a diet and Intermittent Fasting? Dr. Michael Eades does a great job explaining the answer to this question here:
    Diets are easy in the contemplation, difficult in the execution. Intermittent fasting is just the opposite — it’s difficult in the contemplation but easy in the execution.Most of us have contemplated going on a diet. When we find a diet that appeals to us, it seems as if it will be a breeze to do. But when we get into the nitty-gritty of it, it becomes tough. For example, I stay on a low–carb diet almost all the time. But if I think about going on a low–fat diet, it looks easy. I think about bagels, whole wheat bread and jelly, mashed potatoes, corn, bananas by the dozen, etc. — all of which sound appealing. But were I to embark on such a low–fat diet I would soon tire of it and wish I could have meat and eggs. So a diet is easy in contemplation, but not so easy in the long–term execution.Intermittent fasting is hard in the contemplation, of that there is no doubt. “You go without food for 24 hours?” people would ask, incredulously when we explained what we were doing. “I could never do that.” But once started, it’s a snap. No worries about what and where to eat for one or two out of the three meals per day. It’s a great liberation. Your food expenditures plummet. And you’re not particularly hungry. … Although it’s tough to overcome the idea of going without food, once you begin the regimen, nothing could be easier.Dr. Michael Eades
  8. Won’t I have trouble concentrating and feel super tired while I’m fasting? You’d think so, but most people report having more energy and better concentration! Count me in!
  9. Can anyone try Intermittent Fasting? IM is not recommended for people who have eating disorders. Also if you’re pregnant or nursing, if you have diabetes, other blood sugar problems, heart disease or other chronic disease it is best to speak with you doctor before doing an intermittent fast. *Please note that I have been diagnosed with several chronic diseases as well as reactive hypoglycemia that was causing me a lot of problems. Intermittent fasting has helped even out my blood sugar and benefited me in several other ways.

The Takeaway

Intermittent fasting has recently gained notoriety even though it’s been around for ages. More and more studies are showing the benefits of IM on the body. As a flexible eating plan it’s a great way to lose weight and increase concentration and energy.

Have you tried Intermittent Fasting? What did you think? 

Please leave your comments and questions in the comment section below. I love hearing from you and will respond to your messages as soon as possible. Thanks!

If you’d like to learn more about IM you might want to check out:

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.


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5 Good Reasons To Drink Coffee Every Day For Better Health

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By contributing author– Rudy Caretti (biography below)

“So, you love coffee? You are not the only one. Fortunately, an everyday dose of coffee in the right quantity is attributed to various health benefits.

5 Reasons To Drink Coffee Every Day

1. Coffee helps you perform better during workouts.

You may already know, but most supplements taken by athletes contain coffee extracts such as caffeine. There is a scientific reason behind this. Caffeine has several effects on the human system that causes one to do better during physical activity. When taken 30 minutes before any physical activity, black coffee promotes the release of endorphins. These hormones are responsible for our happy moods and adrenaline. These two hormones cause the body to respond positively to any training, leading to better results.

Besides, caffeine alters the way the nervous system responds to pain. This causes the body to endure more strenuous reasons to drink coffeesituations. In this case, your muscles will tolerate longer sessions of intensive endurance- and strength-building exercises.

In a nutshell, caffeine can propel one to train harder, thus improving their results. No wonder scientific research has found coffee can improve athletic performance by about 11-12%.

2. It is loaded with minerals and antioxidants.

The red berry is one food substance packed with many essential nutrients. If you prepare your cup rightly, you are sure to ingest these into your body.

Also, some of the nutrients obtained by drinking coffee include:

  • potassium
  • magnesium
  • niacin
  • riboflavin
  • pantothenic acid

Coffee also contains more antioxidants than a single serving of fruits and vegetables combined.

3. Coffee can keep diseases at bay.

Research shows coffee can help keep dangerous diseases away. Some of these diseases have claimed the lives of many people. Others do not have any known cure. Luckily, one can lower their chances of contracting such ailments by drinking coffee. Some of the said ailments are listed below.

  • Parkinson’s disease: According to Mayo Clinic, “Parkinson’s disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. It develops gradually.” A 2002 report published in the Annals of Neurology showed those who drank java daily lowered their chances of suffering from Parkinson’s by 32% and 60%. This finding was unique to those who enjoyed caffeinated coffee only.
  • Diabetes II: A study by Harvard School of Public Health researchers looked at information collected over 4 years on people with diabetes II and some without. The study was divided into 3 sections. The researchers were interested in finding the relationship between type 2 diabetes and the kind of diet the study subjects were eating. The results showed that among the 7,269 subjects, the people who took at least one cup of coffee each day for those 4 years decreased their chances of developing diabetes II by 11%.
  • Cardiovascular diseases: Contrary to the popular belief that caffeine in coffee can lead to high blood pressure and consequently endanger your heart, research has shown the effect is dismal. Regular intake will not only cause the blood pressure risk to disappear, but also lower your chance of developing heart disease by 20%. This finding was upheld by a Korean study published in 2014. The study found that taking coffee in moderate amounts reduces one’s disposition to coronary artery calcium (CAC). CAC is a key indicator of possible cardiovascular disease.

With the burden of such ailments off your shoulders, you are likely to lead a long, healthy and happier life. No wonder, another benefit you could be enjoying by simply sipping your cup of Joe is the possibility to live longer.

4. It makes your skin and hair blossom.

As mentioned earlier, coffee is packed with many antioxidants and minerals which could help keep your skin healthier and glowing. When the body is getting rid of various toxins successfully, one part that is likely to blemish is your skin. Also, the vitamins and minerals cause your hair to grow faster. Also, did you know you can treat your hair with a cool brew of a strong pot of coffee to make it shiny, stronger and healthier?

reasons to drink coffee5. Coffee improves your mental health.

Good mental health is a result of a combination of several factors. However, the most important one is happiness. Most benefits of coffee discussed above work together to make you a happier person. In this regard, you are likely to enjoy better mental health. There are other ways, however, coffee could be good for your mental well-being.

Based on a 2011 Harvard study, people who enjoyed at least 4 cups of coffee daily lowered the risk of falling into depression by 20%. Depression is one of the many mental disorders that can deprive one the joy of leading a fulfilling life.

The Takeaway

In conclusion, coffee is a delicious beverage many of us enjoy each and every day. There are many reasons to drink coffee including health benefits for our skin, hair, mental health and disease prevention.

For more about coffee, you might like you check out: reasons to drink coffee


Author, Rudy Caretti, has more than 15 years of experience in the coffee industry, a passion that started in Italy within the family business and brought him to found Gimoka Coffee UK and G Coffee Pod with a group of friends, who share the same passion.

Since he roasted his first batch of coffee seeds as a teenager, he was fascinated by the many ways it can be processed to get the many distinctive flavors we all love.

As a coffee connoisseur, Rudy has always been aware of the vital role coffee plays in people’s social life. And he is especially active through the company’s social media and blog. He loves sharing his knowledge with readers around the world, writing and posting articles that range from the coffee brewing techniques to raising awareness of the importance of responsible production to help protect the rights of farmers and protect the environment.

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