Undiagnosed And Suffering With Lyme Disease: I Felt Like I Was Dying

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It’s been 5 years since I was bit by tiny ticks which infected me with Lyme bacteria.  Like the hundreds of thousands of people who get Lyme disease each year, it changed my life radically.

For several months, just like Avril Levigne, I felt like I was dying.

I went from being a healthy and active young mom to 4, to being barely able to walk a few yards to my mailbox. Everyday tasks such as taking a shower and getting dressed became incredibly difficult.

And it all happened so fast.

I realized I had taken my good health for granted, something I’ll not do again.

I was soon able to empathize with friends and family who also were dealing with chronic pain and chronic illness.

Because now I was living it too.

The multiple doctors and specialists I went to couldn’t figure out what was causing my rapidly deteriorating symptoms.

Because of this, I was untreated for 18 very long months.

What Is Lyme Disease Anyway?

When Lyme bacteria, or Borrelia Burgdorferi, has free rein over your body for this long without being treated the damage can cause destruction to every organ and system in the body. This includes the heart, brain, neurological and immune systems.

Lyme is called “the great imitator”. This is because the symptoms are like so many other diseases and conditions. These include Multiple Sclerosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, Sjogren’s syndrome, and many others.

I repeatedly asked the doctors if my illness could be due to the tick bites I got at my home after being in the tall grasslands and forest area behind our house. I became extremely sick shortly after discovering the ticks and thought this was something that should definitely be investigated.

My Lyme diagnosis came much later.

“You Can’t Get Lyme Disease In Missouri.”

suffering with Lyme
Lyme disease has been reported in all 50 states.

Unfortunately, I was told, “You can’t get Lyme disease in Missouri.”

At the time, I was naive to believe that doctors are usually right. Of course, like the rest of us, they are only human.

And, out of necessity, I’ve learned how to advocate for myself as a patient.

I started doing my homework.

And asking the right questions.

The teacher in me. And the life-long learner that I am…It didn’t take long to figure out that, in this case, a wait and see approach was not appropriate.

With Lyme disease it never is.

I persisted in my quest for answers. Finally, the proper tests were given that proved they were tragically wrong.

You can indeed get Lyme disease in Missouri. And I had it.

Suffering With Lyme Disease, YouTube & Forgiveness

I did in fact have Lyme and another potentially deadly tick-borne illness, tularemia.

Since then I have met many caring physicians who are indignant when they hear I was given the run around for so long without proper treatment, especially when the doctors knew I was bitten by ticks and my health continued to go downhill so quickly.

At the time, my primary care physician simply told me that I had “tick fever”. (I was never clear about what that is.)

Later, I returned to this doctor because I wasn’t getting better. I was, in fact, getting much worse. He said I looked stressed (perhaps from the constant pain and insomnia?).

Then he suggested I watch a youtube video about the benefits of walking.

In my naivety, and my strong desire to do everything possible to get healthy, I did as he instructed. Unfortunately, I was unable to walk further than my driveway due to severe air hunger, heart palpitations and extreme weakness and fatigue….all symptoms of Lyme disease!

I don’t believe these doctors meant to harm me even though going so long without a diagnosis did just that. I believe they wanted to help me and were doing the best they knew how with the knowledge and tools they had.

Although I’ve had to work through some difficult and strong feelings like people sometimes do in life, I have no ill will towards them. (For more on this, please feel free to check out The Shocking Truth About Forgiveness And Your Health.)

I do, however, hope that these doctors (and all medical professionals) make concerted efforts to learn more and keep up on the latest about Lyme disease so others don’t have to suffer needlessly too.

If this happened to me it could happen to you or to your loved ones. And I would never wish this horrible disease on anyone! That’s why it’s important to me to share with you to help prevent other people from going through what I, and thousands of others, have.

Finding A New Normal After Lyme Disease

suffering with Lyme
Making healthy choices, managing stressors and listening to your body can help you deal with chronic illness.

Although life is very different for me now, I’m finding a new normal and constantly working to learn more and become as healthy as possible.

I’m thankful for a supportive family and friends.

In some ways life is actually better because I’ve learned to slow down and bask in the moment. Whereas before I was always multitasking, running from one event to the next.

I’m learning to live in the moment. 🙂

Although I lived a pretty healthy life before, I’m much more conscious of making healthy choices now.

I’m more in touch with my body now. I (usually) don’t push past my limits like I used to. (Bad habits are hard to break.)

I also try to better deal with stress in my life instead of ignoring it.

Healing has been a gradual process. But I’m thankful for every gain and positive change that has occurred.

I’m not well, but I’m stronger than I was a year ago. And  that’s definitely a positive in my book!

The Takeaway

Suffering with Lyme disease, then finally getting a diagnosis has been a prolonged and painful process. But God has brought me through and strengthened me through the suffering and trials, and He can do the same for you.

If you have a chronic illness, don’t give up!

You might like to read the following for help and encouragement if you or someone you love has a chronic illness:

Do you have a chronic illness? Can you relate? What tips can you share to help others? 

Please share your comments and questions below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!


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Top 10 Ways To Prevent Lyme Disease (And Other Tick-Borne Diseases)

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The best way to prevent Lyme disease is to avoid outdoor spaces where deer ticks live and breed. This includes tall grass, bushy and forest areas.

But for many of you that simply isn’t realistic, or what you want to do.

So for you who like to venture out and explore this great big world (myself included), it is essential to know how to protect yourself from ticks.

How To Avoid Ticks And Prevent Lyme Disease

prevent Lyme
Wear long pants tucked into long socks and boots to keep ticks out.
  1. Wear light-colored clothing. This makes ticks easier to spot so you can get rid of them before they reach your skin.
  2. Wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts. Button all the buttons so sleeves are tight around the wrists.
  3. Tuck pants into long socks and boots. This prevents ticks from crawling up your legs.
  4. Stay in the middle of trails. Don’t venture off into high grasses or forest areas because ticks are more prevalent there.
  5. Maintain your yard and keep the grass cut and hedges trimmed. Here is a great article to help you tick-proof your yard.
  6. Spray your clothing and shoes with tick repellent. Typically I recommend natural products, but you have to weigh the benefits and risks for yourself. And everyone has their own opinion about this. So you have to decide what works best for you. In the past I’ve made my own essential oil repellents and tried a variety of natural repellents and personally haven’t found them to be as effective. Perhaps I haven’t found the right one. But, based on my situation, I’ve come to the following conclusion: Because I’ve been infected with Lyme twice, I want to reduce the chances of my loved ones getting sick and my being reinfected as much as possible. I just recently overcame my fear of going out into my backyard again. (And trust me, that fear is real. And when you have children it is heightened.) Currently, I’m using a Deet Repellent when I’m in areas I believe ticks may be lurking. (Even though I don’t like the chemicals, I hate the Lyme more.) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a handy online tool to help you select the repellent that is best for you and your family. I also ordered an Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus repellent for a more natural option to repel mosquitoes for when I’m not in tick-infested areas. You can find it here: Cutter Lemon Eucalyptus Insect Repellent. (Like I said earlier, I generally recommend natural products. So if you’re wanting to go all-natural the next tip is for you. Just keep in mind that this option may not be as effective as some of the chemical options.)
  7. Some essential oils that may deter ticks include lemon, citronella, eucalyptus, lemongrass, peppermint, tea tree, geranium, catnip, clove and lavender. Essential oils are quite potent, so mix a few drops with a carrier oil (such as jojoba or olive) and apply to your skin. Or, you may prefer to make your own tick spray. The following video shows how to make a simple essential oil tick spray using only 3 ingredients.
  8. Check your body for ticks. Especially after spending time outdoors. And especially if you have a pet that lives indoors. Use a full-length mirror to check your entire body, taking special care to check the warmest areas, including: under the arms, under where elastic clothing straps have been, inside the belly button (yep, even there), the scalp and all hair, behind the knees, inside the elbows, between the legs, around the waist and inside and around the ears.
  9. Check clothing for ticks. Put clothes in the dryer on high heat to kill ticks.
  10. Check your pets for ticks. Remove any ticks that you find.

How To Remove A Tick

Don’t squeeze or squash the tick. Also, don’t burn it or cover it with petroleum jelly.

First, use a pair of fine-tipped tweezers to remove the tick as close to the skin as possible. Pull the tick straight out.

Then disinfect the entire area.

Save the tick in a ziplock bag or bottle for testing. Label the bag with your name, the date you removed the tick, the site of the tick bite, and how long you believe the tick was attached.

Learn about free tick testing.

Over the next few days and weeks be vigilant and watch for symptoms of Lyme disease. If you develop rashes or flu-like symptoms do not overlook them.

Go to the doctor and report the tick bite and symptoms. 

You can find a Lyme Doctor in your area through this link.

The Takeaway

There are many steps you can take to protect yourself from ticks and Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases. Furthermore, wearing long pants and boots, staying in the middle of trails and avoiding tall grass, shrubs and forest areas are key to prevention.

What tips would you add to this list?

Please share your comments and questions in the comment section below. I love hearing from you!

For more on Lyme disease, you may want to check out:

Connect With Me Below:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
Instagram — @LoriGeurin
Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.

Finally, the information provided in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to treat, prevent, diagnose or cure any disease or health problem.


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The Signs, Symptoms And Stages Of Lyme Disease

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Lyme disease continues to be a hot topic in the news, likely because it is increasing at an alarming rate due to climate changes and other factors.

Between 2004 and 2009 reported cases of Lyme disease rose 94%. What?!

And they continue to rise today.

Fortunately, many people are starting to take notice of this disturbing trend.

But, if Lyme disease continues to spread, often unrecognized and untreated, it won’t take long before everyone either knows someone who has it, or they have it themself.

Lyme is now much more common than AIDS, West Nile Virus, and other vector-borne illnesses.

Knowing what to look out for is crucial.

I’m going to share the signs, symptoms, and stages of Lyme disease below so you know what to watch for. I truly hope this will help you protect yourself and your loved ones.

signs, symptoms and stages of Lyme diseaseSigns Symptoms And Stages Of Lyme Disease

1. Early Localized Lyme Disease (1 to 4 weeks)

This stage can develop from days to weeks after becoming infected.

Symptoms may include:

  • Rashes – Less that 50% of Lyme patients remember developing a rash. Sometimes the rash looks like a bulls-eye. This is referred to as erythema migrans (EM). It is a myth that you must  have this rash to have Lyme disease (1). I did not ever see a bull-eye rash, but have developed a number of unusual red and splotchy rashes since the tick bites (for more on rashes, keep reading below).
  • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever and chills, fatigue, headache, pain or stiffness in the neck and swollen lymph nodes (2).
  • Nausea, dizziness and vomiting

Stage 2: Early Disseminated Lyme Disease Infection (1 to 4 months)

This stage develops when the disease is not found and/or treated properly soon after infection. At this point the infection can begin to affect the joints, heart, nervous system and skin.

Symptoms may include:

  • More rashes that start to appear in different parts of the body due to the infection spreading
  • Paralysis of the facial muscles, or Bell’s Palsy
  • Fainting
  • Headaches or migraines
  • Painful, swollen joints, such as the knees
  • Heart palpitations or Lyme carditis
  • Conjunctivitis, or pink eye
  • Meningitis – swelling of the brain

Late Persistent Lyme Disease, Or Chronic Lyme

Failure to treat Lyme promptly can cause damage to the brain, joints and nervous system. This is the most serious stage.

Symptoms may include:

  • Extreme exhaustion which is not relieved by sleeping or resting
  • Inability to control facial muscles
  • Heart problems, such as pericarditis
  • Tingling and numbness of the hands and feet
  • Arthritis, often in the larger joints, such as the knees
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Confusionsigns symptoms and stages of Lyme disease
  • Difficulty thinking or reasoning
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Getting lost, even in familiar areas
  • Anxiety, panic attacks
  • Seizures
  • Tremor
  • Sensitivity to sound, light and smells
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Mood swings, depression
  • Sleep disorders
  • Migrating joint and muscle pain
  • Vertigo
  • Difficulty hearing
  • Vision difficulties
  • Weight gain or loss
  • “Air hunger”
  • Pain in the chest or ribs
  • “Heart block”
  • Neck pain, stiffness and cracking
  • Night sweats
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Heart murmur or valve prolapse
  • Light-headedness, dizziness
  • Menstrual irregularity

The Takeaway

This list of signs, symptoms and stages of Lyme disease is not exhaustive. I’ve talked to a lot of people with Lyme and many of our symptoms are similar, but others are different.

My friend, if you are struggling with an illness and the doctors have been unable to help you, you may want to consider this list to help you rule out (or in) Lyme disease, especially if you spend a lot of time outdoors or live in a tick-infested area.

And of course, if you know you’ve been bit by a tick, mosquito, etc and aren’t feeling well, please get yourself checked out immediately.

Here is a list of doctors who specialize in treating Lyme patients. I would highly recommend starting here.

Do you have any of these symptoms? Or do you have an unexplained illness and can’t seem to get answers?

Please share your comments below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!

For more on Lyme disease, you may want to check out:

Connect With Me Below:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
Instagram — @LoriGeurin
Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.

Finally, the information provided in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to treat, prevent, diagnose or cure any disease or health problem.


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Experts Caution Increased Lyme Disease Risk : Reports Of Possible Tickmageddon On The Rise

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Happy May Day friends!

When I was a girl on May 1st my mom and I would make beautiful May Day baskets. Then we would drive around to deliver them, usually to my grandmother’s houses.

I’d set the basket down by the front door, ring the door bell, and run and hide. It was always fun hiding and watching my sweet grandmas open the door to find the small gift we had left them. My little brother, took part in the action too, probably more interested in the running and hiding if memory serves.Lyme disease risk

I’m curious if anyone still does this? I have to admit I haven’t continued this tradition with our children. I did it with them a couple of times when they were really little but now they’re grown up.

When I was a girl growing up in Missouri I knew all about May baskets, but I didn’t know about Lyme disease, even though I loved being outdoors and had been bit by ticks several times.

Fortunately, I was healthy until 2012 when I was bit by 2 more ticks and, to make a long story short, have been dealing with the cruel effect of Lyme disease and the damage it’s done to my body ever since.

May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month and I’m planning to share several posts about Lyme this month.

The Media Reports About Lyme Disease Risk

Even if you’re not a news buff you’ve likely seen something about Lyme disease on the news recently.

Many researchers have predicted that 2017 will be the worst ever for new Lyme disease infections. This is likely due to the mild winter and unique climate conditions which makes an enticing environment for ticks.

The volume of news articles and interviews about Lyme is considerable. It’s baffling to me how much is written about Lyme, yet how many people continue to suffer.

We still need to find a cure for all for Lyme. If Lyme is diagnosed and treated appropriately early on it can be eradicated in many cases.

The problem is that for many people this doesn’t happen. Lyme is often misdiagnosed. And once the Lyme bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi has time to invade your body, it settles into every organ and system, causing untold damage.

Diagnostic tests are notoriously inaccurate. And most treatments are not covered by insurance.

Considering the seriousness of the disease and the massive amount of people affected by it, it is alarming that we’re so far behind. For more on this, keep reading.

The CDC Staying Surprisingly Quiet About Lyme Disease Amidst Widespread Concern

In a recent article on www.thehuffingtonpost.com, contributor David Michael Conner said he did a Google search of news including Lyme disease from March 26 to April 26, 2017 and it returned 43 pages of results, which is a lot.

He then compared the results he found to basic facts with HIV and Zika and shared his findings in the following graphs:

Lyme disease risk
Lyme Disease, HIV and Zika (photo courtesy www.huffingtonpost.com)

Here you can see that Lyme is clearly the most widespread disease of the three, but receives next-to-nothing when it comes to federal funding. And as author, Conner points out,

“The news media, in other words, show a greater acknowledgment of the disease than federal public health agencies. That comes down to the nature of the news, though; …most of the substantive coverage of Lyme comes from local news outlets, and the reason for this is that those outlets reflect the realities of their communities—whereas national news organizations are more likely to report what they are told by federal health authorities are the reporting priorities. This designation is supremely important to keep in mind.”

Conner also mentions that in the past 30 days the CDC, “the agency responsible for protecting the public’s health interests” has tweeted:

  • 20 times about Zika virus
  • 3 times about HIV
  • 2 times about swimming pool urine
  • ZERO times about Lyme disease

If you want to read this article in its entirety I’d urge you to check it out here: What The Media Don’t Tell You About Lyme Disease (But Should).

 The Takeaway

The media has had much to say about Lyme disease recently. And while bringing awareness to Lyme can be a positive things, it’s essential to sift through information for the facts.

Many experts warn the Lyme disease risk may be greater now than ever. And despite the vast media attention and expert warnings, the CDC has remained unusually quiet about Lyme disease. This raises many questions and concerns which need to be investigated further.

Do you know someone with Lyme? Have you noticed Lyme disease in the news recently? 

Please share your thoughts below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!

 For more on Lyme disease, you may want to check out:

Connect With Me Below:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
Instagram — @LoriGeurin
Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.


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Spring Break Adventures With The Family And Tips For Traveling With Chronic Illness

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Hey guys! I’ve been out of the blogosphere for a few days because we took the family on a little spring break adventure to Florida.

I’ve missed being in touch and posting, so I thought I’d share a bit about our trip to let you know what’s been going on in my world.

I took my laptop on the trip thinking I’d write along the way, but between being so busy and feeling pretty wiped out from the fast pace, it simply didn’t happen.

David and I agreed it was one of our favorite trips with the kids yet. I was so thankful the boys could come because they’re often busy with work or other activities like college kids are.

Every family has their own vibe and when we all get together, there’s usually a lot of laughter, and with the 6 of us, things can get pretty loud.

We all love music, joking around, the occasional debate (some more than others-ha!), and having fun.

Spring Break, 2017

traveling with chronic illness
MO State Basketball – David and the girls

The weekend before our flight left for Florida we’d been in Columbia, MO for the Class 4 State Basketball Tournament where our Bolivar High School boys played in the championship game.

They played hard and did a great job!

We went back home for a night and repacked for Florida.

The next afternoon we flew into Orlando and moved into our hotel near SeaWorld.

Universal Studios, Islands Of Adventure

We woke up early the next morning, ate a big breakfast and headed to Universal Studios, Islands of Adventure.

traveling with chronic illness
The kids at the Harry Potter castle.
traveling with chronic illness
Sweet Emma enjoying a Butterbeer.

Drew and Cooper have read the Harry Potter books and seen the movies, and Maddie and Emma have read and seen some too, so this was definitely something they wanted to check out!

Some of the kids even tried the Butterbeer.

We rode ALL the rides we were interested in riding and then some. Thankfully we all love to ride roller coasters so no one was left out and it was a blast. 🙂

Talk about a G-force extravaganza!

And we did a lot of walking! At the end of the day my fitbit said I’d taken over 15,000 steps!

traveling with chronic illness
Cooper trying Butterbeer.
traveling with chronic illness
David and Drew at Universal

Wowza!

By 5:00 we’d conquered all the rides and had such a fun and full day.

We were hungry! So we headed out to Freddy’s for giant burgers and fries and frozen custard (because vacation ;)).

Then back to the hotel to crash around the pool and go to sleep.

SeaWorld

Rest.

Rinse.

And Repeat.

Woke up early. Ate a big breakfast. Headed to SeaWorld first thing.

traveling with chronic illness
Love them.

SeaWorld has changed so much since when D and I were kids. I thought it was pretty cool then, but they have some of the best coasters now, including Mako, Kraken and Manta.

The weather was gorgeous! The lines to the rides were short. I don’t think we had to wait more than 10 minutes to ride anything so we were loving that!

Plus, the shark aquarium is super cool and the Antarctica penguin exhibit

traveling with chronic illness
Coop and penguins

is so fun! Are penguins not the cutest little birds?!

We talked to some beautiful parrots…”Polly want a cracker?”

And petted the stingrays. The leopard print ones were my favorite!

We saw several shows, all of them entertaining and impressive

  • dolphins
  • killer whales
  • sea lions  (arrr, arrr, arrr!)
traveling with chronic illness
Not sure what this is about, but I like it. 😉

Overall, it was another super-fun day! And my fitbit said I had walked

about 14,000 steps….much more than I’ve done lately. Thankful.

But, whew, was I feeling the burn!

We were all hungry for dinner and went to Moe’s and filled up on giant burritos and burrito bowls made with fresh ingredients, including cilantro lime rice and guacamole (my personal favorite).

Then back to the hotel for some relaxation by the pool until we were ready to turn in for the night.

Tips For Traveling With Chronic Illness

If you or someone you love have a chronic illness, you probably understand how difficult traveling can be.

For me, traveling is one of my favorite things to do. I love the beach and won’t pass up an opportunity to go if humanly possible.

But since getting Lyme disease and a host of related medical issues, traveling is often challenging in ways that I never considered before when I was healthy.

I love to be on the go and be involved and it really bums me out when I can’t keep up with everyone else (but it won’t stop me from trying).

Even so, there have been plenty of trips when I’ve been stuck in the hotel room with a migraine, or in too much pain or too exhausted to move, etc. I can definitely be pretty stubborn when it comes to accepting this and have a lot of work to do in this area. But trust me, I get it. It really stinks to be shut in when everyone else is out exploring and having fun.

But then again, I’m praying and working towards recovery of my health so I’m not willing to give in.

I’ve learned the hard way plenty by overdoing it (as I’m sure many of you have too) and then spending a week or more recovering flat-out exhausted.

We all make our choices I suppose.

But you know what? You only live once, and (assuming your doctor hasn’t put restrictions on your activities) sometimes, to me, it’s so worth it to have to take a few days off to recover when I return from a trip.

Like right now, I’m wiped out, but I’m thankful to be able to write this blog post.

This particular trip I made the mistake of forgetting my turmeric curcumin supplement I take for  body pain.

Nothing is perfect, but if we can learn to go with the flow it helps!

Tips To Help When Traveling With Chronic Illness

  • Pack your medicines, supplements, etc. ahead of time to make sure you have everything you’ll need. Research the area you’re visiting. Not to be a Debbie Downer, but do they have a hospital nearby in the case of an emergency? It’s good to be prepared.
  • Communicate with your family or friends you’re traveling with. Be honest about your medical limitations and how you’re feeling.
  • Give yourself grace! You probably won’t be able to do everything you want to do but that’s okay. This is the hardest concept for me but I keep repeating it to myself and it really helps.
  • Be thankful for the small things. Focus on the positives. They are always there. Sometimes we just have to look a little harder to find them.
  • Keep a gratitude journal. I’ve found the more I’m aware of all I’m grateful for, the less I’m aware of the frustrations that come with my illness.
  • Show kindness to your travel companions. Say thank you. When you’re not feeling well it’s so easy to forget this, for me anyway. Try to remember that your illness is not only difficult for you, but can be hard on your loved ones too….because they love you and care about you and want you to feel better.
  • Drink lots of water! Eat healthy, whole foods.
  • Move your body. Gentle stretching is wonderful. If you’re up for a short walk that’s great too.
  • Get some fresh air. Take in the sunset in a comfy chair. Go barefoot outside.
  • Be flexible when scheduling outings.
  • Have fun!

    traveling with chronic illness
    Push ups by the pool

The Takeaway

Thanks for letting me share about our family trip with you!

We’ve enjoyed plenty of “staycations” and they can be super fun too, but I’m thankful it worked out for us to get away together this time.

I want you to know that if you enjoy traveling like I do, you don’t have to give it up just because you have a chronic illness.

Remember to be prepared, honestly communicate how you’re feeling with your travel buddies, give yourself grace, be flexible with your travel plans, focus on the positives and get some fresh air.

Do you enjoy traveling? Do you or someone you love have a chronic illness? What tips would you add to this list?

Please share your thoughts in the comment section below. I love hearing from you and will reply to your comments as soon as possible!

If you liked this, you might want to check out:

Connect With Me:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
Instagram — @LoriGeurin
Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.


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Why Do People With Lyme Disease Not Catch Colds And The Flu?

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So, as I write this I’m living in a house full of sick people.

Completely surrounded by influenza.

And contagious germs.

Caring for all of my ailing family members.

And I’m thankful for one thing Lyme disease might be good for….preventing me from catching colds and, in this case, the flu that otherwise “healthy” people get.

Seriously.

Ever since I’ve had Lyme I can be surrounded with a highly contagious illness, but over and over rarely, if ever get “sick”.

If you have Lyme, you know this is a small consolation considering everything else we deal with, but each little thing helps, right?

I mean, we may end up going to the doctor, emergency room, or hospital for a number of other Lyme-related health problems, but if I can bypass the colds, flu, and other assorted viruses out there….I’ll take it.

For now anyway.

Interestingly, a friend who has Lyme told me her doctor was encouraged when she started catching colds and viruses her children would catch at preschool. He said this was a good sign.

But why, I want to know?

Does it mean her immune system is beginning to work like it’s supposed to again?

Why Do (Some) People With Lyme Disease Not Catch Colds And Flu?

I’ve researched this strange phenomenon online and have found many fellow “Lymies” who have the same experience. But I’ve had a hard time finding any concrete explanation for why this happens.

So if you know can you please share with me? 🙂

We’re told by our doctors that our immune systems are messed up, so I’m guessing this has a lot to do with it.

But is it because our immune system is so weak and worn down from trying to fight the Lyme and co-infections?

Or perhaps our immunity is in overdrive and simply wipes out every invader that comes close. But, if that were true, would we even have Lyme in the first place?

Or, here’s another thought. Because many of us have felt like we’ve had the flu every day since we were infected with Lyme disease maybe we can’t recognize a “little” cold? (I’m not implying a cold is little, just using it as an example.)

So many questions. Please help!

As a sidenote, I’ve read on some message boards that people with MS and a few other autoimmune conditions experience this same crazy phenomenon.

The Takeaway

If you have Lyme or know someone who does, do you still catch colds and other illnesses or not? Have you read or heard a good explanation for why this happens?

Please share your thoughts and opinions below in the comment section. I’d love to hear what you have to say! Hopefully we can all help each other figure this out. 🙂

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