22 Essential Tips To Avoid Holiday Weight Gain

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Many people experience weight gain during the holidays. avoid holiday weight gain

With colder weather, comfy sweaters and family gatherings it’s easy to pack on a few pounds.

Please tell me I’m not alone here.

But you can still enjoy the holidays and avoid holiday weight gain by following these essential tips.

22 Tips To Avoid Holiday Weight Gain

1. Eat a protein-rich snack before you go out.

If you arrive at a holiday party famished you’re likely to overeat. Avoid mindless snacking by choosing a healthy snack, such as the one of the following:

  • Greek yogurt and berries
  • a handful of healthy fat-rich nuts, such as almonds, pecans, cashews, or walnuts
  • an apple with peanut butter, or other nut butter
  • a protein shake, like My Favorite Peanut Butter Protein Shake
  • hard-boiled eggs
  • string cheese
  • jerky
  • hummus and veggies

2. Stay active.

Many families enjoy sitting around and watching parades, Christmas music specials or ballgames during the holidays.

While there’s certainly nothing wrong with these traditions, all this inactivity can lead to weight gain. This is especially true if we’re also eating too much rich food (1)

Rather than lounging around all day, consider:

  • taking a family walk, either outside or inside a mall
  • going ice skating
  • building a snowman with your kids
  • going sledding

These activities will burn calories while giving you the opportunity to bond with loved ones.

3. Pay attention to portion sizes

With all the delicious foods prepared during the holidays, it can be tempting to overeat.

But, people who eat larger portion sizes tend to gain weight more than those who don’t (2).

Makes sense, right?

Read food labels to discern correct portion sizes. Use measuring cups and spoons to measure your food.

4. Get adequate sleep.

Did you know that not getting enough sleep can lead to weight gain and a slowed metabolism (3, 4)?

When we don’t sleep enough we tend to eat more and exercise less. Our hunger hormone levels increase and this raises calorie intake.

5. Don’t hang out by the food at a party.

If you linger by the delicious dishes and desserts, the temptation to indulge is greater.

But if you step away from the food and focus more on talking to people you’ll save calories, and you just might have more fun. 😉

I’m reminded of the phrase, “Out of sight, out of mind”.

The same thought applies to your pantry at home. Throw out the junk food so it’s not there tempting you to eat it.

avoid holiday weight gain
Shake it off! Reduce holiday stress.

6. Keep stress under control.

The holidays are stressful sometimes.

There are people to see, presents to buy and wrap and recipes to make.

But it’s important to keep our stress levels under control.

When we are chronically stressed, our levels of cortisone go up. This can cause us to eat more and gain weight (5).

Focus on activities that reduce stress, such as exercise and deep breathing techniques.

I found an app that helps you focus on reducing stress. It’s called Calm.

7.  Prep a healthy dish to share.

Bringing a healthy dish to holiday gatherings can give you something healthy to eat even if everything else is rich or sugar-laden. This can help you keep your healthy eating goals in check.

It also gives others the opportunity to try a delicious and healthful recipe!

8. Use a smaller plate.

Using large plates often leads us to consume more calories. If not kept in check, this can lead to weight gain (6).

Using a small plate helps you control portion sizes and reduce overeating.

9. Avoid processed food.

This includes most foods packages, boxes or bags of food.

Processed foods are often stripped of nutrients. And most have added unhealthy fats, sugar and preservatives.

10. Keep a food diary.

Write down everything you eat, or use an app to help you.

If you’re like me, I often underestimate how much I eat in a day.  Keeping a food diary helps me stay on track with my goals and be more aware of what I’m putting in my mouth.

My favorite app is MyFitnessPal. You might like to try it.

11. Weigh yourself weekly.

Okay, so there are conflicting viewpoints when it comes to weighing yourself. Some people weigh a few times a week. Some never.

It’s good to keep in mind that weight fluctuations are normal day-to-day.

But, many people find it helps them stay accountable and makes them more aware of their progress if they weigh weekly (7).

12. Watch your beverage and alcohol intake.

Soda, juice, alcohol and other beverages are full of empty calories and sugar. These factors contribute to weight gain (8).

The best thing to drink?

You guessed it….water!

13. Take smaller bites and chew your food thoroughly.

Eliminate distractions, such as electronics, and eat mindfully, savoring each delicious bite (9).

14. Keep a consistent workout routine.

Stick to your regular fitness routine as much as possible. Consistent training produces better results.

And that leads me to tip, #15.

15. Stay positive even if you get off track.

Don’t beat yourself up or stress about it. Simply restart your commitment a healthy life and get back on track.

Simply focus on your health and fitness goals and keep moving forward with your plan.

It might help to use Motivational Quotes And Power Phrases.

16. Drink a glass of water before meals and snacks.

Sometimes we think we’re hungry when our body just needs water. Drinking water fills us up and helps prevent overeating (10).

17. Leave a few bites of food on your plate.

Are you a member of the “clean plate club”?

It’s okay to admit it, I used to think I had to clean my plate too.

Try leaving a few bites of food on your plate. You probably won’t even miss them and the calories you’ve saved add up and can help prevent weight gain.

18. Eat loads of veggies.

Filling up on plenty of fresh vegetables and fruits can help prevent obesity (11). They’re filled with vital nutrients and vitamins as well as healthy fiber.

19. Lift weights.

Building muscle is one of the best ways to increase your metabolism and burn more calories.

A great way to build muscle is by doing a kettlebell workout.

You may want to check out 20 Reasons To Try A Kettlebell Workout to learn more.

20. Fill up on fiber.

Eating more fiber fills you up faster which can prevent you from eating as much and gaining weight (12).

Fiber-rich foods include:

  • fruits
  • vegetables
  • nuts
  • seeds
  • legumes
  • whole grains.

21. Buddy up.

Find a friend who has similar health goals and give each other accountability.

Having someone to work out or swap health recipes can help you stay on track.

22. Avoid sugar and simple carbs.

Eating too much sugar is a common cause of weight gain and obesity (13).

When you come face to face with the desserts this holiday season, focus on selecting only your favorites and leaving the rest.

This will save you from sugar overload and help keep your blood sugar in a manageable range.

avoid holiday weight gainThe Takeaway

What are ways you try to stay healthy during the holidays?

Please leave your comments below. I’d love to hear from you!

If you enjoyed this, you may want to read:


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The Health Benefits Of Rebounding On A Mini Trampoline

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* This post may contain affiliate links.

What’s airborne and wears a big smile?benefits of rebounding

You…jumping on a mini trampoline!

Corny jokes aside, rebounding is one of the healthiest (and most fun) activities you can do.

It improves lymph flow, is easy on the joints, increases strength and bone mass and is great for detoxing.

The NASA Rebounding Study

Astronauts lose muscle and bone mass in space due to the weightlessness they experience in the zero gravity environment.

NASA was looking for an exercise which would help astronauts regain bone and muscle mass. As you probably know, weight-bearing exercise increases bone mass.

In 1980 NASA studied the benefits of rebounding. They learned it is a highly effective weight-bearing exercise which is easy on the skeletal system and joints.

When rebounding the pressure, or G-force, is more evenly distributed throughout the body. In contrast, when you’re running almost all of the pressure is at the ankles, which can lead to injuries.

These findings were recorded in The Journal Of Applied Physiology.

And more good news for those of you who despise running — NASA’ s research showed that rebounding can be twice as effective as running on a treadmill! (1) 😉

Benefits Of Rebounding

1. Improves balance

In a study of elderly women, significant improvements in postural balance were recorded after the women completed trampoline workouts for 12 weeks. (2).

2. Relieves stress

Turn on some upbeat jams and jump your worries away!

Once your blood starts pumping you’ll forget about your to-do list.

3. Circulates oxygen to the tissues

Oxygen is vital for survival and strengthens our cells.

In one study, participants jumping on a trampoline showed increased oxygen uptake. Because of gravity changes that take place when rebounding, more oxygen is able to get to the cells. (3)

4. Improves lymphatic circulation and detoxification

Our lymph system is in charge of moving the “junk” out of our bodies.  And exercise encourages this full-body detox.

The up-down movement of rebounding is one of the best ways to increase lymph flow, helping move toxins out.

Many holistic doctors recommend it for their patients.

You may want to read more about the lymph system here.

5. Improves the resting metabolic rate

As your muscles grow stronger, your body burns more energy when it is at rest. This can help if you’re trying to lose weight.

6. Strengthens the heart and other muscles

Rebounding provides cardiovascular benefits and strengthens the heart muscle.

According to James White, Ph.D., director of research and rehabilitation in the physical education department at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), jumping offers many benefits to other muscles as well:

Rebounding allows the muscles to go through the full range of motion at equal force. It helps people learn to shift their weight properly and to be aware of body positions and balance.

7. Increases bone mass

As I mentioned above, the NASA study showed astronauts returning from space had improvements in bone density after doing rebounding workouts.

8. Strengthens the immune system

The rebounding movement stimulates the body’s immune system due to the increased G-force.

The immune cells include the macrophages and T-lymphocytes. Their job is to rid the body of harmful bacteria, viruses and cancer cells.

How To Do A Rebounding Workout

If you’re just starting out, I suggest taking it slow.

Rather than jumping too high, you can start with small bounces, keeping your feet in contact with the trampoline or mini trampoline.

As you get used to the feeling of being on the trampoline you can jump a little higher, increase the intensity, or try a variety of different moves such as high knees, jumping jacks and trampoline squats.

But if you like to keep it simple, feel free to do a basic bounce.

I usually rebound 5-15 minutes a day for detox.

The Takeawaybenefits of rebounding

Rebounding on a mini trampoline has some pretty impressive health benefits. These include increased muscle and bone mass, enhanced digestion, detox and lymph drainage.

Purchasing a mini trampoline is a small investment. I bought mine through Amazon.com and it only cost $27.22 (with Prime shipping). I’m really happy with it.

You can see the one I bought here.

Academy Sports has a good selection of trampolines also.

Do you own a trampoline? Can you think of more benefits to add to this list?

If you enjoyed this article, you might like to read:

Here’s a beginner’s rebounding workout you might like to try.

 

 


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Is Chronic Lyme Disease Real? Part 2

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Chronic Lyme disease is a hot topic in the news lately.chronic Lyme disease

Several celebrities, including Avril Lavigne, Ashley Olsen and Yolanda Foster recently announced they have Lyme.

According to the CDC, over 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme each year. And countless others have it, but haven’t been diagnosed yet.

Just The Facts, M’am

If you get Lyme and are treated promptly with an appropriate dosage of doxycycline, your odds of making a recovery may be good.

However, we’re talking about people, including myself, who are not treated promptly and suffer debilitating, long-term effects of the disease.

For me, it took 18 very long months for multiple doctors and specialists to figure out what was wrong with me.

This was despite my insistence that I wanted to be tested for Lyme because I had become severely ill after getting bit by 2 tiny ticks one spring.

I eventually tested positive for Lyme and tularemia on different tests, including antibody and the Western Blot. I was “CDC positive”.

You can read more about the need for better testing here.

The Hippocratic Oath

Before my ordeal I didn’t realize things like this really happened to patients. Isn’t part of the oath physician’s take, the Hippocratic Oath, to “first do no harm”?

So how could so many people be suffering from ongoing Lyme symptoms despite visiting numerous doctors?

According to eyeonannapolis.net:

In 2014, there were 26,000 confirmed cases of Lyme Disease in the US, with an additional 6,000 cases that are probable but unconfirmed. The CDC estimates that over 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme Disease in the US every year. That’s 1.5 times the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, six times that number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, and more than nine times the number of people facing Zika virus.

Lyme Lessons

I certainly don’t have all the answers, but I’m learning much through this journey.

I believe God brings good out of bad situations because I’ve seen it.

One of the most helpful things I’ve learned is how to advocate for my health, and the health of others.

People who are suffering with a debilitating illness need kindness and compassion. If you’ve been there you know what I’m talking about.

However, hundreds of thousands of Americans are diagnosed with Lyme each year. The painful truth is that way too many of these people are diagnosed months or years later, giving the Lyme bacteria, borreliosis burgdorferi, time to wreak havoc on a body.

This is often called “chronic Lyme”.

The CDC refers to lingering Lyme symptoms as “post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome”, or PTLDS.

But, it really doesn’t matter (to me) what you call it. I’m not saying it’s not important, but just that we need to focus more on the people who are suffering.

The fact is that debilitating pain and the myriad of other Lyme symptoms are all too real.

If a patient is suffering physically they deserve proper medical care that’s covered by insurance.

“Is Chronic Lyme Disease Real Or Not?”

That is the million dollar question. And while the debate rages on I want to encourage us to keep our focus on the hundreds of thousands of people who are suffering. 

Because at the end of the day, what or who really matters more than people?

chronic Lyme disease
People matter most.

Additional Info About Lyme

Please feel free to check out my story:

If you didn’t read part 1 in this series, you may want to read it here:

Is Chronic Lyme Disease Real? Part 1

And if you’d like to learn more about Lyme you may want to check out:

chronic Lyme disease

Do you or someone you love have Lyme disease?

Please share your comments and questions below. I love hearing from you!


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7 Tips For Coping With Chronic Illness

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This article was originally published on GriefLossHope.com, a website dedicated to sharing stories of grief and loss and giving hope and encouragement to help others who are going through similar situations.

Having a chronic illness can impact your life in countless ways. The life you knew before your coping with chronic illnessillness may seem like a distant memory, especially when you’re dealing with many symptoms and concerns.

You could in constant pain and unable to get a good night’s sleep. You might have to quit your job and suffer financial problems.

Your appearance may change. Or you may look the same, making it even harder to explain your illness to the outside world. Your interpersonal relationships can change, when suddenly your spouse or loved one takes on the roll of caregiver.

All of these changes can cause stress and strong feelings of anxiety, fear and anger. Many people feel a lack of control and uncertainty about the future.

According to the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. chronic disease lasts more than 3 months, cannot be prevented by a vaccine or cured by medicine, and does not disappear.

I have learned first hand what it’s like to have a chronic illness, beginning in the spring of 2012.

My Journey From Health To Chronic Illness

Before the illness I was healthy and active, a wife to my wonderful husband, mom to four amazing kids, teaching Special Education full-time at a local public school.

But, then I was bit by 2 tiny ticks and everything changed.

I initially became so sick with a mind-numbing headache and crippling nausea that I was in bed several days trying to recover. I was so weak I could barely walk. My coloring was pale and ashen. It felt like the worst case of the flu I’d ever experienced. I was so out of it that I don’t remember much from those few days.

Unexplained Symptoms

When I had recovered enough to go to the doctor I asked him about Lyme disease. At this time I didn’t know much about it, other than it was a tick-borne illness.

The doctor asked if I’d traveled to the northeastern United States, but the furthest I’d been that direction was North Carolina. He then told me, “You can’t get Lyme disease in Missouri”. He said I had “tick fever”.

Tests were not ordered. Prescriptions were not written.

The doctor told me it would take time, but I would feel better eventually.

But in the months between the tick bites and my eventual Lyme disease diagnosis I felt like I had the flu nearly every day.

As a teacher, I was around children all day. Inevitably, I came into contact with many germs on a daily basis.

I was exposed to many illnesses over the years due to having four children of our own. And I didn’t remember getting sick so often. In fact, my resistance to illness had always been strong.

So I initially thought perhaps I was getting sick a lot due to exposure to all the germs I came into contact with . I usually just pushed through my illness knowing my family and students were depending on me. I figured I’d improve with time.

But, as the weeks and months passed, I began to experience other concerning symptoms I couldn’t ignore. An unrelenting pain began coursing throughout my entire body. The pain was so strong and constant I couldn’t sleep.

I felt exhausted all the time, had trouble breathing, and experienced frequent, intense migraines.

Lethargy and extreme weakness became the norm.

I developed a heart murmur and had frequent heart palpitations, even while lying in bed.

Memory Problems And More

And I started forgetting things and stumbling for the words I wanted to say. The brain fog was so great at times it was starting to worry me.

I was driving one morning and came upon a traffic light feeling confused. As I sat at the intersection a few seconds, I struggled to remember whether the green or red light meant to stop or go. The driver behind me showed frustration with my indecision. He started honking for me to go.

Also, I recall getting lost a few times when I was driving.  And I started calling our children by the wrong names.

I wondered if I was getting Alzheimer’s.

During these 18 months leading up to my diagnosis I went to multiple doctors including several specialists. They gave me a variety of tests and innumerable blood work all in an effort to figure out what was wrong with me.

I was placed in a Holter monitor for 36 hours to test for heart problems.

My doctor ordered months of Physical Therapy due to muscle weakness and wasting. I lost 20 pounds in a short time for no apparent reason.

My doctor and Physical Therapist expressed concerns about Multiple Sclerosis. Thankfully, I was tested and MS was ruled out.

Searching For Answerscoping with chronic illness

I was diagnosed eventually with multiple chronic and autoimmune conditions including:

  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • Mixed Connective Tissue Disease
  • Tularemia (another tick-borne illness)

I had multiple allergic reactions to a variety of foods, ran a fever nearly every day and would get hives and strange rashes on my face, neck and torso (where the tick bites occurred).

I developed mild dyslexia for a time and had difficulty reading numbers. As an avid reader I developed a great frustration when reading text.

Around the same time I started having twitching and tremors in my hands, arms, legs and abdomen.

I recall one time when I had been bedridden for several days, running a high fever and missing several days of work.

I could barely walk anymore without extreme effort and felt as though I was dying.

And I didn’t understand why all of this was happening. I had always been so healthy before the tick bites.

I wanted to find out the root cause of my illness. But each time I went to the doctor, it seemed like they only wanted to treat my myriad of symptoms. It was incredibly frustrating.

But I knew everything had to be related to the tick bites. And I persisted in sharing this with my doctors until they listened and gave me the recommended tests.

Psychological Stages Of Chronic Pain And Illness

According to Jennifer Martin, PsyD, there are Seven Psychological Stages of Chronic Pain and Illness:

  • Denial
  • Pleading, Bargaining and Desperation
  • Anger
  • Anxiety and Depression
  • Loss of Self and Confusion
  • Re-evaluation of Life, Roles and Goals
  • Acceptance

I found myself going through these stages, sometimes between two or three at a time.

Questioning God

At this point I started losing hope in ever finding out what was wrong with me.  And I began questioning God.

I asked Him, “God, if you truly love me then why is this happening to me and my family?” I felt confused, angry and forgotten.

I’m humbled to admit I reached this low point in my life journey. I never would have predicted that I’d one day question the very existence of the God I’d believed in and loved as long as I could remember.

Nevertheless, it’s part of my story, and I want to be real. 

Facing my health crisis tested my limits. And I was confronted with my mortality.

I now believe that God was testing my faith throughout my illness. Sometimes I kept my eyes on Him, and sometimes I was stubborn and went my own way.

Isn’t it amazing how we can learn so much from the past, but when we’re living in the moment it isn’t always that clear? (At least this has been my experience)

He Was With Me All Along

Lately God has shown me how He was there for me, even when I was living through the most painful days.

I see now how He has been with me every step of the way, when I was crying out to Him for help and healing — and even when it seemed like God was being silent.

As God reveals Himself to me I see now that part of my story is a renewed faith in Him and hope for His plans for my future.

 I love, “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified because of them (or what you’re going through), for the LORD your God goes with you; He will never leave you nor forsake you (emphasis mine)” (Deuteronomy 31:6).

I’m thankful He promised “He will never leave you nor forsake you”. I love what Jon Bloom says about our human perceptions:

And when we feel forsaken by God we are not forsaken (Hebrews 13:5). We are simply called to trust the promise more than the perception.

coping with chronic illnessIn the midst of the trials, and despite His faithfulness to me and our family, I still felt alone much of the time. I learned this is common for people confronting chronic pain or illness.

I believe God was and is saying to me , “Take up your cross and follow me…(no matter what) (emphasis mine)” (Matthew 16:24).

I may be a slow learner, but I’m so thankful for His grace and patience with me through it all. And I’m looking forward to what He’s going to do in the coming years. He continues to bring beauty from ashes.

My illness has taught me to take time to slow down (although this is still a challenge). I’m learning to refocus my priorities. For me, this includes prayer and having real, meaningful conversations with the people I love.

I hope you will learn from my mistakes and be encouraged in whatever challenges you experience in life.

Tips For Coping With Chronic Illness

1. Educate Yourself

Read, study and learn as much as you can about your condition or disease. While doctors are highly trained professionals, please conduct your own research before believing everything you hear.

I’m pleased with the team of doctors managing my medical care and treatment. If you aren’t happy with the level of care you receive consider getting a second opinion or switching doctors.

Before I have an appointment I make a list of questions to ask the doctor. This helps me be more efficient, prioritizing my essential questions first to make sure they’re addressed.

Also, consider using the internet to research. Sometimes the internet gets a bad reputation for providing hokey information. But, if you search medically reputable websites, I’ve found you can learn so much useful information.

I’m a bit of a research nerd, so this process is actually fun for me. If you’re not sure what sites can be trust, you may want to ask your doctor for recommendations.

2. Express Gratitude

Say “thank you” to your loved ones, friends, and family. Being chronically ill isn’t easy for them either, especially if they are taking on more responsibility.

My dear husband has helped take our children to multiple practices and events. This is in addition to his full-time job as a High School Principal. He found it difficult to see me sick. But he cared for me throughout my most difficult days. I’m forever grateful to him for his love and support.

In addition to expressing gratitude to others, I recommend keeping a Gratitude Journal. I try to jot down one or two things I’m thankful for.

Sometimes I’ll write down a favorite verse, Motivational Quote or Power Phrase. I can come back later and read what I’ve written for encouragement and reflection.

3. Do Not Let Your Illness Define Youcoping with chronic illness

You can take charge and manage your disease instead of letting it define you. In the midst of chronic illness, do not lose your identity.

Face your fears. Take one day at a time.

Don’t give into the temptation to have a pity party.

Instead, reframe your negative thoughts.

Think of a way to help someone else, even if you are bedridden. Maybe you could text or call an old friend or loved one who is facing their own crisis. Strive to be an encouragement to others.

Keep moving forward.

4. Give Yourself Grace

A wise friend gave me this advice when I was in the throes of my Lyme battle. I was trying to keep up with my duties as a wife, mom, daughter and friend.

But it was not possible for me to maintain the level of busyness I’d been accustomed to my entire life.

I had to learn to give myself grace. When feelings of guilt would creep in (because I was not able to do many of the things I did when I was healthy) I had to remind myself of this. I had to find a new normal.

Releasing myself from the pressure of being a do-it-all wife and mom allowed me to focus on what was really important.

5. Make Healthy Choices

Follow a healthy diet. Eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

If necessary, lose weight. (17 Ways To Lose Weight Faster can help you get started.)

Get fresh air and soak up the sun to increase vitamin D production. Exercise, if possible, to keep your body strong and flexible.

coping with chronic illnessConsider using essential oils as a natural treatment for pain and insomnia.

Learn how coconut oil, apple cider vinegar and other natural ingredients can help improve your health.

Look into intermittent fasting and find out if it might help you with symptoms.

6. Be An Advocate For Your Health

This is one of the most essential things I’ve learned. When I was going through the most serious, painful time of my illness no one could tell me what was going on.

The doctors and specialists prescribed multiple prescriptions (many of which I never took). One suggested watching a video about walking. They told me to get a massage, get more rest, eat a gluten-free diet etc.

They meant well, but their suggestions didn’t address the root cause of my illness.

Thankfully, (albeit 18 months later) I tested positive for Lyme disease and other tick-borne illness co-infections.

This was a turning point in my illness.

We felt relieved to have an explanation why my body was deteriorating. Even though no one wants to hear they have a chronic illness, we finally knew what we were dealing with. And that helped bring peace to the situation.

7. Seek Support

Building a support system is vital. Talking with supportive family and close friends can help. You might consider joining a support group or message board where people who have the same condition share experiences and hopes for the future.

I have a few friends who have Lyme disease. We communicate via Facebook, email and talking on the phone. We share our progress and treatments that have helped and encourage each other.

If you’d like to learn more about my story you may want to read:

Also, you may like to read about The Spoon Theory in Chronic Illness: What’s A Spoonie Anyway?

Can you relate to any of the Psychological Stages Of Chronic Illness And Pain?

Do you have more tips for dealing with chronic pain and illness? Please leave your comments below. I love hearing from you!


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Celebrities With Lyme Disease

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Are you a “news junkie”?

celebrities with Lyme
Celebrities With Lyme Disease

Recently, I’ve seen several stories in the news about famous people with Lyme disease.

As more and more people come forward sharing their story it brings much-needed awareness and can give hope to others.

Celebrities With Lyme

I’m not typically that into celebrity news, but I’m curious about reading these particular stories.

I like to keep up with current events and medical developments about Lyme. As it continues to affect more people I believe we’ll hear more about it. And this may be part of what it takes to get better diagnostics and testing for patients.

Yolanda Foster

I recently ran across an article about model, Gigi Hadid who was honoring her mother, Yolanda Foster.

Yolanda and her 2 other children recently announced they have “chronic Lyme disease“.

Disregard For Human Life

 One man, “Dan K” insensitively remarked below the article, “Chronic Lyme disease doesn’t exist.  Please stop this ‘awareness’ campaign lol.” 🙁
celebrities with Lyme
photo courtesy Yolanda Foster Instagram

Mr. Dan K’s comments make my stomach turn.

One might say that the comments reflect poorly on him, but don’t affect the Lyme crisis. And there’s truth to that, to be sure.

But it also points to the stark difference in perspective between the Lyme patient who is struggling to survive and the vocal, yet uneducated person who seeks to bring others down when they are physically weak and hurting.

Callous comments like these perpetuate misunderstanding and lack of empathy for people who are fighting for their very lives.

They need:

  • support
  • hope that they can get better
  • proper diagnosis
  • timely and adequate treatments
  • appropriate insurance coverage of medical costs

For me, ignorant comments such as these strengthen my resolve to bring a voice to those impacted by tick-borne illnesses. But it’s also a good reminder that we need to check our sources before believing everything we read on the internet.

When I returned to read the article a second time I noticed his unkind remarks were removed. 

Living Out Lyme Disease On Reality TV

Yolanda has fought her Lyme battle in the public eye on a reality TV show, The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. Although I’ve never seen the show (we don’t have cable TV), a friend told me about some episodes where she was very ill and receiving IV treatments for Lyme.
One of my doctors I see for LDI (low dose immunotherapy) is the same one she and her kids go to.

She recently left the show to focus on her health and “restoring privacy” to her family.

I appreciate all that Yolanda and others have done to advocate and bring greater awareness to the seriousness of Lyme.

Other Famous People With Lyme

celebrities and Lyme
Ticks can carry Lyme disease, which is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria.

In recent years, more celebrities (and famous people) have come forward about having Lyme:

  • Avril Lavigne
  • Former US President, George W. Bush
  • Daryl Hall, of Hall and Oates
  • Alec Baldwin
  • Ashley Olsen
  • Richard Gere
  • Ben Stiller
  • writer, Amy Tan
  • Debbie Gibson
  • Jamie Lynn Sigler

Some are still battling ongoing symptoms, while others who were promptly treated have, thankfully, recovered.

Avril Lavigne

In a recent interview with People magazine, Avril Lavigne said,

I felt like I couldn’t breathe, I couldn’t talk, and I couldn’t move. I thought I was dying.

If you have Lyme you might relate to this. When I was bedridden, in the depths of my illness I remember experiencing these same things and telling my husband I thought I was dying.

In the following video Avril Lavigne shares more about her experience:

The Takeaway

Celebrities have a platform to reach lots of people.

Some prefer privacy with their health struggles, and that’s understandable, especially when many of their private lives are photographed for the world to see.

But in the media-obsessed world we live in, celebrities have a unique opportunity to influence, encourage and educate others about Lyme. And this brings greater awareness, something which is long overdue and desperately needed.

celebrities with LymeCan you think of other famous people who have Lyme? Do you or someone you love have a tick-borne illness?

Please share your thoughts below in the comment section. I love hearing from you, friends!

If you would like to read more about Lyme disease you may want to check out:


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