Fun In Nashville: Cupcake ATM, The Parthenon & Girls Day Out

fun in Nashville

If you missed my earlier post I shared about a recent trip we took to Tennessee.

It’s easy to have fun in Nashville! We’ve been a few times over the years. There’s so much to see and do. I wanted to share a little more of our trip with you if you’re able to visit the area sometime.

Many people enjoy the slower pace of the South and even the Southern accents when visiting there, especially if you’re from another part of the country.

(You may want to learn how to speak with a Southern drawl in How To Speak With A Southern Drawl, The Heimlich Maneuver And A Mini-Vacation To Nashville.)

The Parthenon At Centennial Park

fun in Nashville
The girls at The Parthenon in Centennial Park.

Centennial Park is located 2 miles west of downtown Nashville. It features a walking trail, sunken garden, dog park, pond and a variety of aquatic life.

A section of the park contains historic wartime memorabilia, including cannons from the Civil War, an Air Force fighter jet from the Korean War and a locomotive.

The Parthenon is the only full-scale replica of the original Greek temple. The building is quite impressive in size and the detail is impeccable.

The girls and I enjoyed a girls day out touring downtown Nashville on foot, then capping off our adventures at The Parthenon. It’s a wonderful place for capturing memorable photos!

There is an art gallery inside The Parthenon you can pay a bit extra to view, but we had to get back to the hotel to pick up D for dinner so we didn’t do this.

Here’s some more information on Centennial Park and The Parthenon.

fun in Nashville
The girls walking down Broadway in Nashville.

Fun In Nashville: Live Music

We walked down to the Cumberland riverfront and the girls took a few pictures.

We went to Ryman Auditorium, which was home to the Grand Ole Opry from 1943 until 1974.

There, I took the girls picture with a life-size bronze statue of Little Jimmy Dickens. He was 4 foot, 11 inches tall. Apparently the statue is fairly new and was recently introduced, along with a Bill Monroe statue, by country music greats Brad Paisley and Ricky Skaggs on June 7, 2017.

We strolled the Broadway strip, otherwise known as country music row. Saw lots of boot and cowboy hat shops, and tons of restaurants.

Live music is playing all the time. And not just country music, but also jazz, rock, and bluegrass.

Fortunately I did a little research ahead of time and found some inexpensive parking in the downtown Nashville Public Library parking garage. It was $4.50, I think. The library is pretty impressive on its own.

Pizza And A Cupcake ATM With Cousins

fun in Nashville
The girls and their cousins in Nashville pre-cupcake ATM (AKA, sugar rush).

After our trip to the city, the girls and I returned to the hotel, picked up David (who had attended educational conferences all day) and drove to meet my sweet sister-in-law and her kids for pizza and dessert.

Because my sister-in-law lives in Nashville she knows some of the best places to eat and fun things to do. She had some great suggestions and I appreciate her sharing them with me!

We went to a fun cupcake place called Sprinkles for dessert. They have a cupcake ATM, you can order cupcakes 24/7 and they come out in a cute little box. I tried a dark chocolate one and it was amazing!

The kids had fun and we enjoyed getting together!

The Takeaway

fun in Nashville
The girls and I with Johnny Cash at The Gaylord Opryland Hotel. Some of us were trying to figure out if he was real or not, thus the wide-eyed expressions. #helookssoreal (The bag behind my back reveals we had just returned from the Opry Mills shopping mall.)

As you can probably tell, we had fun in Nashville last week. It was nice to see some new scenery for a few days.

I hope you are able to get away or do something fun and out of the ordinary this summer.

We all need times of refreshing in our lives, whether it’s spending time with family or friends, listening to great music, taking a mini-vacation, going on a walk in nature or even using a cupcake ATM.

Sometimes it’s the simple things that can bring us the greatest joy.

What do you enjoy doing when you need a break from the everyday routine?

Please share below in the comment section! I love connecting with you!

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How To Speak With A Southern Drawl, The Heimlich Maneuver And A Mini-Vacation To Nashville

Southern drawl

Hey y’all!

How’s that for a Southern accent? Hope y’all don’t mind me tryin’ it out on ya. 😉

So, part of our family (David, the girls and I because the boys had work) just returned from a fun mini-trip to Nashville, Tennessee. And I’m pretty sure if I stayed much longer I’d pick up their Southern drawl fairly quickly.

Why?

  1. Because I like the relaxed vibe of the South.
  2. Because when I was in college my friends from the “Northern” U.S. commented on my Southern accent and I was asked several times if I was from Texas. True story. This, despite the fact that I was born and raised in good ‘ole Southwest Missouri.

    Southern drawl
    Cowboy boots never go out of style.
  3. I like cowboy boots.
  4. And cowboy hats.

I guess this goes to show that everyone has an accent of one kind or another.

And our perception of another person’s “accent” is influenced by where we’re from and the dialect we’re used to hearing and speaking.

Interesting, right?

Drawn To His Southern Drawl

So, we had a discussion about accents on the 7-hour trip down (or east from Southwest Missouri). Like how David lost his Southern accent and how long you have to live somewhere (such as Nashville) before you start to talk like the locals.

D is originally from Kentucky and when I met him in college I was drawn to his Southern drawl.

He sat behind me in a class and after several days of hearing his smooth Kentucky accent, always the curious one that I am, I just had to turn around and put a face to that voice.

And boy was I glad that I did. 😉

(He’ll love me for saying that.)

The rest they say is history…

Well there was a bit more than that.

Southern drawl
Carrots are nutritious and high in beta carotene.

Like the time he gave me the Heimlich Maneuver in our college cafeteria (shout out to Meller’s Cafeteria! where our son, Cooper now works) when I choked on a very large carrot.

For real.

My airway was completely obstructed and he saved my life!

Maybe that sealed the deal?

But I’m pretty sure I knew he was the one way before that.

Based on the Southern drawl and all.

Y’all.

Why Learn To Speak With A Different Accent?

Southern drawl
We saw lots of cowboy boots and guitars in Nashville. Boot, scootin’ boogie.

There are different reasons for wanting to learn to speak with a Southern drawl:

  • if you’re an actor, you can expand your repertoire
  • it’s fun!
  • to impress your friends and family
  • to impersonate someone from the South

Okay, so maybe not the last one.

If you enjoy learning new things like I do, you may like this next part.

Tips For Speaking With A Southern Accent

  • Speak slowly–People from the South tend to draw out their words, especially the vowel sounds. There’s a lilt to their speech and a single syllable vowel can become two syllables. For example, “fill” becomes “fee-hill.”
  • Drop the “g”s. So words that end in “ing” will lose the “g”. For example, “eating” becomes “eatin'” and “running” becomes “runnin’.” Some of us tend to do this in the Ozarks too.
  • Use “y’all” instead of “you all” every chance you get. Even better, and a slight variation, try using “all y’all.” This is my personal favorite.
  • Remember your manners. Generally speaking, Southerners are polite. So try, “‘Scuse me”, “Thank ya”, “Yes M’am”, and “Sir” on for size.
  • Learn and practice some local phrases. Over the years I’ve been entertained by D’s long list of “Kentuckyism’s. These are phrases, or sayings, he grew up hearing in his home state of Kentucky. Many of them he learned from his Granny Mildred, I think. Examples of such colloquialisms could include: “As scarce as deviled eggs after a church picnic” or “I love them roastin’ ears (corn on the cob)” and “If the good Lord’s willin’ and the creek don’t rise.”
  • It’s important to keep in mind when we’re talking like someone from the South (or any other region or country) that we show sensitivity to their culture so we don’t cause hurt feelings or offense.

Here’s a video that can help you understand Southerners and some of the things they say. (I realize the still video picture below goes against my comment above about showing cultural sensitivity, but thought it was one of the more informative videos so chose to share it anyway. Hopefully it doesn’t offend anyone out there…this is definitely not my intention.)

The Takeaway

It can be fun to visit new places and observe and interact with different people.

Nashville is an especially fun place to travel to. It’s rich in Southern pride and tradition.

Every person has a unique accent. There are different reasons you might want to learn to speak with a Southern accent. Learning new things can be fun! Or maybe you’re thinking of moving to Nashville to work at becoming a country music star. More power to ya.

Either way, I hope you continue learning new things, and exploring new horizons. Most of all, I hope you had fun reading this post!

Do you like learning new things? Do you enjoy traveling, meeting new people and experiencing new cultures? 

Please share below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!

For more on our trip to the South, you may enjoy: Fun In Nashville: Cupcake ATM, The Parthenon & Girls Day Out

If you enjoyed this, you might want to check out:

Learn how to do the Heimlich Maneuver here.

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Undiagnosed And Suffering With Lyme Disease: I Felt Like I Was Dying

suffering with Lyme

It’s been 5 years since I was bit by tiny ticks which infected me with Lyme bacteria.  Like the hundreds of thousands of people who get Lyme disease each year, it changed my life radically.

For several months, just like Avril Levigne, I felt like I was dying.

I went from being a healthy and active young mom to 4, to being barely able to walk a few yards to my mailbox. Everyday tasks such as taking a shower and getting dressed became incredibly difficult.

And it all happened so fast.

I realized I had taken my good health for granted, something I’ll not do again.

I was soon able to empathize with friends and family who also were dealing with chronic pain and chronic illness.

Because now I was living it too.

The multiple doctors and specialists I went to couldn’t figure out what was causing my rapidly deteriorating symptoms.

Because of this, I was untreated for 18 very long months.

What Is Lyme Disease Anyway?

When Lyme bacteria, or Borrelia Burgdorferi, has free rein over your body for this long without being treated the damage can cause destruction to every organ and system in the body. This includes the heart, brain, neurological and immune systems.

Lyme is called “the great imitator”. This is because the symptoms are like so many other diseases and conditions. These include Multiple Sclerosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, Sjogren’s syndrome, and many others.

I repeatedly asked the doctors if my illness could be due to the tick bites I got at my home after being in the tall grasslands and forest area behind our house. I became extremely sick shortly after discovering the ticks and thought this was something that should definitely be investigated.

My Lyme diagnosis came much later.

“You Can’t Get Lyme Disease In Missouri.”

suffering with Lyme
Lyme disease has been reported in all 50 states.

Unfortunately, I was told, “You can’t get Lyme disease in Missouri.”

At the time, I was naive to believe that doctors are usually right. Of course, like the rest of us, they are only human.

And, out of necessity, I’ve learned how to advocate for myself as a patient.

I started doing my homework.

And asking the right questions.

The teacher in me. And the life-long learner that I am…It didn’t take long to figure out that, in this case, a wait and see approach was not appropriate.

With Lyme disease it never is.

I persisted in my quest for answers. Finally, the proper tests were given that proved they were tragically wrong.

You can indeed get Lyme disease in Missouri. And I had it.

Suffering With Lyme Disease, YouTube & Forgiveness

I did in fact have Lyme and another potentially deadly tick-borne illness, tularemia.

Since then I have met many caring physicians who are indignant when they hear I was given the run around for so long without proper treatment, especially when the doctors knew I was bitten by ticks and my health continued to go downhill so quickly.

At the time, my primary care physician simply told me that I had “tick fever”. (I was never clear about what that is.)

Later, I returned to this doctor because I wasn’t getting better. I was, in fact, getting much worse. He said I looked stressed (perhaps from the constant pain and insomnia?).

Then he suggested I watch a youtube video about the benefits of walking.

In my naivety, and my strong desire to do everything possible to get healthy, I did as he instructed. Unfortunately, I was unable to walk further than my driveway due to severe air hunger, heart palpitations and extreme weakness and fatigue….all symptoms of Lyme disease!

I don’t believe these doctors meant to harm me even though going so long without a diagnosis did just that. I believe they wanted to help me and were doing the best they knew how with the knowledge and tools they had.

Although I’ve had to work through some difficult and strong feelings like people sometimes do in life, I have no ill will towards them. (For more on this, please feel free to check out The Shocking Truth About Forgiveness And Your Health.)

I do, however, hope that these doctors (and all medical professionals) make concerted efforts to learn more and keep up on the latest about Lyme disease so others don’t have to suffer needlessly too.

If this happened to me it could happen to you or to your loved ones. And I would never wish this horrible disease on anyone! That’s why it’s important to me to share with you to help prevent other people from going through what I, and thousands of others, have.

Finding A New Normal After Lyme Disease

suffering with Lyme
Making healthy choices, managing stressors and listening to your body can help you deal with chronic illness.

Although life is very different for me now, I’m finding a new normal and constantly working to learn more and become as healthy as possible.

I’m thankful for a supportive family and friends.

In some ways life is actually better because I’ve learned to slow down and bask in the moment. Whereas before I was always multitasking, running from one event to the next.

I’m learning to live in the moment. 🙂

Although I lived a pretty healthy life before, I’m much more conscious of making healthy choices now.

I’m more in touch with my body now. I (usually) don’t push past my limits like I used to. (Bad habits are hard to break.)

I also try to better deal with stress in my life instead of ignoring it.

Healing has been a gradual process. But I’m thankful for every gain and positive change that has occurred.

I’m not well, but I’m stronger than I was a year ago. And  that’s definitely a positive in my book!

The Takeaway

Suffering with Lyme disease, then finally getting a diagnosis has been a prolonged and painful process. But God has brought me through and strengthened me through the suffering and trials, and He can do the same for you.

If you have a chronic illness, don’t give up!

You might like to read the following for help and encouragement if you or someone you love has a chronic illness:

Do you have a chronic illness? Can you relate? What tips can you share to help others? 

Please share your comments and questions below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!


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Best Superfoods For Spoonies: Chronic Illness Symptom Relief

best superfoods

Living with a chronic illness is a struggle, all the more so when the illness is not physically evident. Some people assume you’re perfectly healthy when, in fact, seemingly mundane tasks are hard to fulfill.

People living with chronic illnesses (known casually as ‘spoonies’ in a term coined by lupus sufferer Christine Miserandino, who established the Spoon Theory to communicate an understanding of what her life is like) will draw upon medically prescribed treatments to help with their condition.

The Best Superfoods for Spoonies

They may also seek natural remedies, such as superfoods. These superfoods such as garlic, turmeric, ginger and salmon can provide much-welcome relief to symptoms of chronic illnesses.

Most of them contain anti-inflammatory ingredients which relieve pain and help to prevent cancer, while some are beneficial in terms of stabilizing cholesterol levels. Indeed, the consumption of salmon can even help to fight against feelings of depression. Depression is a hidden illness which can often be experienced by people suffering from other chronic illnesses.

The infographic below from Burning Nights identifies seven of the best superfoods for spoonies and deals specifically with five common hidden illnesses, highlighting the best and worst foods for those concerned.

A person living with a chronic illness is likely to grasp at any remedy which can relieve feelings of pain. Consequently, these superfoods could make their condition easier to endure.

Read below to find out more.

best superfoods
Superfoods For Spoonies (courtesy Burning Nights)

I want to express a big thank you to Victoria Abbott-Fleming who is the founder of the chronic pain charity, Burning Nights, for sharing this excellent information and the visual featured above. Also, you can visit her website at Burning Nights.

The Takeaway

Eating superfoods such as ginger, turmeric, garlic, berries and grapes, olive oil, hot peppers and salmon can have amazing healing benefits for people with chronic illness. As a result, the best superfoods are an excellent substitute to pharmaceutical drugs for anyone who favors natural remedies and solutions to chronic pain.

Consequently, I can tell you from personal experience these superfoods really work!

Along with other healthy choices a few months ago I started taking turmeric curcumin daily. As a result, I’ve been able to stop taking two medications I was taking daily for chronic pain from chronic Lyme disease symptoms.

Please note, don’t ever stop taking medications without talking to your doctor first. 

Do you or someone you love have a chronic illness? Have you tried any of these superfoods? Please share your comments in the comment section below. I love hearing from you! 

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This post contains affiliate links. And you can read our Affiliate Policy here.

Finally, the information provided in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA. It is not intended to treat, prevent, diagnose or cure any disease or health problem.


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Top 10 Ways To Prevent Lyme Disease (And Other Tick-Borne Diseases)

prevent Lyme

The best way to prevent Lyme disease is to avoid outdoor spaces where deer ticks live and breed. This includes tall grass, bushy and forest areas.

But for many of you that simply isn’t realistic, or what you want to do.

So for you who like to venture out and explore this great big world (myself included), it is essential to know how to protect yourself from ticks.

How To Avoid Ticks And Prevent Lyme Disease

prevent Lyme
Wear long pants tucked into long socks and boots to keep ticks out.
  1. Wear light-colored clothing. This makes ticks easier to spot so you can get rid of them before they reach your skin.
  2. Wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts. Button all the buttons so sleeves are tight around the wrists.
  3. Tuck pants into long socks and boots. This prevents ticks from crawling up your legs.
  4. Stay in the middle of trails. Don’t venture off into high grasses or forest areas because ticks are more prevalent there.
  5. Maintain your yard and keep the grass cut and hedges trimmed. Here is a great article to help you tick-proof your yard.
  6. Spray your clothing and shoes with tick repellent. Typically I recommend natural products, but you have to weigh the benefits and risks for yourself. And everyone has their own opinion about this. So you have to decide what works best for you. In the past I’ve made my own essential oil repellents and tried a variety of natural repellents and personally haven’t found them to be as effective. Perhaps I haven’t found the right one. But, based on my situation, I’ve come to the following conclusion: Because I’ve been infected with Lyme twice, I want to reduce the chances of my loved ones getting sick and my being reinfected as much as possible. I just recently overcame my fear of going out into my backyard again. (And trust me, that fear is real. And when you have children it is heightened.) Currently, I’m using a Deet Repellent when I’m in areas I believe ticks may be lurking. (Even though I don’t like the chemicals, I hate the Lyme more.) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a handy online tool to help you select the repellent that is best for you and your family. I also ordered an Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus repellent for a more natural option to repel mosquitoes for when I’m not in tick-infested areas. You can find it here: Cutter Lemon Eucalyptus Insect Repellent. (Like I said earlier, I generally recommend natural products. So if you’re wanting to go all-natural the next tip is for you. Just keep in mind that this option may not be as effective as some of the chemical options.)
  7. Some essential oils that may deter ticks include lemon, citronella, eucalyptus, lemongrass, peppermint, tea tree, geranium, catnip, clove and lavender. Essential oils are quite potent, so mix a few drops with a carrier oil (such as jojoba or olive) and apply to your skin. Or, you may prefer to make your own tick spray. The following video shows how to make a simple essential oil tick spray using only 3 ingredients.
  8. Check your body for ticks. Especially after spending time outdoors. And especially if you have a pet that lives indoors. Use a full-length mirror to check your entire body, taking special care to check the warmest areas, including: under the arms, under where elastic clothing straps have been, inside the belly button (yep, even there), the scalp and all hair, behind the knees, inside the elbows, between the legs, around the waist and inside and around the ears.
  9. Check clothing for ticks. Put clothes in the dryer on high heat to kill ticks.
  10. Check your pets for ticks. Remove any ticks that you find.

How To Remove A Tick

Don’t squeeze or squash the tick. Also, don’t burn it or cover it with petroleum jelly.

First, use a pair of fine-tipped tweezers to remove the tick as close to the skin as possible. Pull the tick straight out.

Then disinfect the entire area.

Save the tick in a ziplock bag or bottle for testing. Label the bag with your name, the date you removed the tick, the site of the tick bite, and how long you believe the tick was attached.

Learn about free tick testing.

Over the next few days and weeks be vigilant and watch for symptoms of Lyme disease. If you develop rashes or flu-like symptoms do not overlook them.

Go to the doctor and report the tick bite and symptoms. 

You can find a Lyme Doctor in your area through this link.

The Takeaway

There are many steps you can take to protect yourself from ticks and Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases. Furthermore, wearing long pants and boots, staying in the middle of trails and avoiding tall grass, shrubs and forest areas are key to prevention.

What tips would you add to this list?

Please share your comments and questions in the comment section below. I love hearing from you!

For more on Lyme disease, you may want to check out:

Connect With Me Below:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
Instagram — @LoriGeurin
Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.

Finally, the information provided in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to treat, prevent, diagnose or cure any disease or health problem.


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The Signs, Symptoms And Stages Of Lyme Disease

signs symptoms and stages of Lyme disease

Lyme disease continues to be a hot topic in the news, likely because it is increasing at an alarming rate due to climate changes and other factors.

Between 2004 and 2009 reported cases of Lyme disease rose 94%. What?!

And they continue to rise today.

Fortunately, many people are starting to take notice of this disturbing trend.

But, if Lyme disease continues to spread, often unrecognized and untreated, it won’t take long before everyone either knows someone who has it, or they have it themself.

Lyme is now much more common than AIDS, West Nile Virus, and other vector-borne illnesses.

Knowing what to look out for is crucial.

I’m going to share the signs, symptoms, and stages of Lyme disease below so you know what to watch for. I truly hope this will help you protect yourself and your loved ones.

signs, symptoms and stages of Lyme diseaseSigns Symptoms And Stages Of Lyme Disease

1. Early Localized Lyme Disease (1 to 4 weeks)

This stage can develop from days to weeks after becoming infected.

Symptoms may include:

  • Rashes – Less that 50% of Lyme patients remember developing a rash. Sometimes the rash looks like a bulls-eye. This is referred to as erythema migrans (EM). It is a myth that you must  have this rash to have Lyme disease (1). I did not ever see a bull-eye rash, but have developed a number of unusual red and splotchy rashes since the tick bites (for more on rashes, keep reading below).
  • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever and chills, fatigue, headache, pain or stiffness in the neck and swollen lymph nodes (2).
  • Nausea, dizziness and vomiting

Stage 2: Early Disseminated Lyme Disease Infection (1 to 4 months)

This stage develops when the disease is not found and/or treated properly soon after infection. At this point the infection can begin to affect the joints, heart, nervous system and skin.

Symptoms may include:

  • More rashes that start to appear in different parts of the body due to the infection spreading
  • Paralysis of the facial muscles, or Bell’s Palsy
  • Fainting
  • Headaches or migraines
  • Painful, swollen joints, such as the knees
  • Heart palpitations or Lyme carditis
  • Conjunctivitis, or pink eye
  • Meningitis – swelling of the brain

Late Persistent Lyme Disease, Or Chronic Lyme

Failure to treat Lyme promptly can cause damage to the brain, joints and nervous system. This is the most serious stage.

Symptoms may include:

  • Extreme exhaustion which is not relieved by sleeping or resting
  • Inability to control facial muscles
  • Heart problems, such as pericarditis
  • Tingling and numbness of the hands and feet
  • Arthritis, often in the larger joints, such as the knees
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Confusionsigns symptoms and stages of Lyme disease
  • Difficulty thinking or reasoning
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Getting lost, even in familiar areas
  • Anxiety, panic attacks
  • Seizures
  • Tremor
  • Sensitivity to sound, light and smells
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Mood swings, depression
  • Sleep disorders
  • Migrating joint and muscle pain
  • Vertigo
  • Difficulty hearing
  • Vision difficulties
  • Weight gain or loss
  • “Air hunger”
  • Pain in the chest or ribs
  • “Heart block”
  • Neck pain, stiffness and cracking
  • Night sweats
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Heart murmur or valve prolapse
  • Light-headedness, dizziness
  • Menstrual irregularity

The Takeaway

This list of signs, symptoms and stages of Lyme disease is not exhaustive. I’ve talked to a lot of people with Lyme and many of our symptoms are similar, but others are different.

My friend, if you are struggling with an illness and the doctors have been unable to help you, you may want to consider this list to help you rule out (or in) Lyme disease, especially if you spend a lot of time outdoors or live in a tick-infested area.

And of course, if you know you’ve been bit by a tick, mosquito, etc and aren’t feeling well, please get yourself checked out immediately.

Here is a list of doctors who specialize in treating Lyme patients. I would highly recommend starting here.

Do you have any of these symptoms? Or do you have an unexplained illness and can’t seem to get answers?

Please share your comments below in the comment section. I love hearing from you!

For more on Lyme disease, you may want to check out:

Connect With Me Below:

Pinterest — /LoriGeurin
Facebook — /LoriGeurinBlog
Twitter — @LoriGeurin
Instagram — @LoriGeurin
Bloglovin — lorigeurin
Email — healthylife@lorigeurin.com

This post contains affiliate links. You can read our Affiliate Policy here.

Finally, the information provided in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to treat, prevent, diagnose or cure any disease or health problem.


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